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Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end in prison after pleading not guilty to murder in the shooting death of 27-year-old Odin Lloyd, was involved in an altercation with another inmate at the Bristol County House of Correction in Dartmouth, but neither man required medical attention, a Massachusetts sheriff said Wednesday.The altercation took place Tuesday in a common area of the facility, where only one inmate at a time is supposed to be out of his cell, Sheriff Thomas Hodgson said.Hodgson said jail staff are interviewing witnesses and reviewing surveillance video to figure out what happened and determine whether disciplinary measures or criminal charges are warranted.“An altercation took place between two inmates, and one of them was Aaron Hernandez,” Hodgson told ABC News. “We will be studying video and proceeding with interviews to determine why and how the incident took place to determine whether internal discipline or criminal charges are warranted.”The jail also is reviewing procedures to learn how the inmates were permitted out of their cells at the same time.“It was very brief,” Hodgson said. “The officers were right there, and it was stopped within seconds, maybe a minute.”Hodgson did not release the other inmate’s name and said he did not know of any previous tension between the two.“We don’t know what, if any, relationship there was or has been at any point, either here or anywhere else,” Hodgson said.Both Hernandez and the other inmate have been moved to other units until the investigation is completed. read more

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Kyrie Irving responded twice to the negative backlash he received for his celebratory yacht party last Friday which seemingly hosted only white women. Twitter initially reacted furiously to the pro baller’s turn-up, which was held after he won the NBA Finals with LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavilers last week.Once video surfaced of the bash at Atlantis Paradise Island resort in the Bahamas, social media users made their feelings known.But y’all dumb and just wanna perpetuate an angry black girl stereotype ?— Puddon (@Itsprincesssyd_) June 24, 2016Irving responded cryptically to the criticism June 25. In a photo posted on Instagram, he focused on the two women who were “all different shades.” The caption was complete with the hashtag #tryadifferentstory.https://www.instagram.com/p/BHEEUnpA0zx/But the backlash continued and the star was led to address it head on in a Facebook post Wednesday afternoon.“I was raised by the Black women in my family,” Irving wrote. “And for me to be connected to some nonsense like a ‘No Black girls allowed’ party is embarrassing and an inaccurate portrayal of who and what I represent as [a] man.”“I would like to apologize to anyone if they were offended initially without knowing any of what actually happened, but that story has no truth to it and I wanted to clear the air on all of this B.S,” he wrote suggesting there were Black women present. “And for those who know me, I’m sorry you all had to answer questions about a story as ridiculous as something like this.”The statement drew mixed reactions.Julianna Lobosky, a white woman, blamed the negative online response on pulling the race card.Cedreca Zabardast Strickland-Peacock was pleased that no Black women were at the party, alluding to lewd activities that occur at such events.But Tea Porter felt whether or not the party was white women only others acting like such a gathering would be okay was problematic.Dellyian Oteng Kobby had a colorblind view of  the situation. read more

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2018Chris BallardIndianapolis ColtsActive SeasonGMTeamStatus 2017Howie RosemanPhiladelphia EaglesActive Source: Pro Football Writers of America 2009Bill PolianIndianapolis ColtsFired Jan. 3 2012 2013John DorseyKansas City ChiefsFired June 22, 2017 2016Reggie McKenzieOakland RaidersFired Dec. 10, 2018 Is this award cursed?Employment history of the winners of the past 10 awards for the NFL executive of the year from the Pro Football Writers of America 2012Ryan GrigsonIndianapolis ColtsFired Jan. 21, 2017 2015Mike MaccagnanNew York JetsFired May 15, 2019 2010Scott PioliKansas City ChiefsFired Jan. 4, 2013 2014Jerry JonesDallas CowboysOwner 2011Trent BaalkeSan Francisco 49ersFired Jan. 1, 2016 In a move that surprised many, the New York Jets on Wednesday fired general manager Mike Maccagnan and named head coach Adam Gase as the team’s interim GM. The timing was unusual in that Maccagnan just last month had job security enough to oversee the team’s draft, including the selection of the third overall pick in defensive tackle Quinnen Williams. Maccagnan was likewise given the freedom to spend $125 million in free agency this offseason, which included paying for easily replaceable production by signing former Pittsburgh star Le’veon Bell at running back. Maccagnan was also reportedly instrumental in hiring Gase, a decision that may have ultimately led to his ouster.Maccagnan’s fall from grace was precipitous. He was named executive of the year by the Pro Football Writers of America for the 2015 season, his first as Jets GM. That season, he helped shepherd the Jets to a 10-6 record, coming up a win short of the playoffs. Now, less than four years after being recognized as the top executive in the league, Maccagnan is unemployed.But perhaps we should have known his days were numbered when he won that award. Shockingly, this honor has become the front office equivalent of the Madden curse. Seven of the past 10 award winners have been fired. Of the three winners who still have jobs, one — Jerry Jones — is an owner who is unlikely to fire himself, and the other two are the most recent recipients: Howie Roseman in 2017 and Chris Ballard in 2018. For the seven fired GMs, the average time from winning executive of the year to being unemployed works out to a brisk 1,122 days, or just over three years. Former Colts’ GM Bill Polian leads the seven in time served, with a 12-year run with the Colts and 22 years total as an NFL executive prior to winning a record fifth executive of the year award in 2009. He stepped down as GM after the 2009 season but remained vice chairman of the team, and then he began the decade of despair by getting unceremoniously fired — along with his son, who succeeded him as GM — two years later.It’s interesting to note that the longest-tenured GMs in the NFL who aren’t also owners — the Patriots’ Bill Belichick and the Steelers’ Kevin Colbert — have never won the award. Neither has Washington’s on-again, off-again GM Bruce Allen, and he’s been able to hold on to a spot in the organization for the past nine years. Perhaps owners and league observers are giving GMs both too much credit when things go well and too much blame when things come up pear-shaped. Half of the honored executives during the past decade worked as GMs of the Colts and the Chiefs, suggesting that the teams they inherited might have been just as important to their success.Often, GMs on the list rose and fell based on the fortunes of their head coaches or quarterbacks. San Francisco’s Trent Baalke won the award while paired with head coach Jim Harbaugh, who would take the Niners to the brink of Super Bowl glory. But Harbaugh departed for Michigan, and Baalke was quickly dismissed after he hitched his wagon to a sweaty and confused Jim Tomsula and the ghost of Chip Kelly. Indianapolis’s Ryan Grigson, gifted the first overall pick in his rookie year as a GM, took an absolute no-brainer in quarterback Andrew Luck and reaped the benefits for five years, posting a record of 52-34 as a GM before being fired.The reigning executive of the year, Chris Ballard, might be an exception. Ballard worked under fellow award winner and former mentor John Dorsey in Kansas City. Dorsey was fired soon after Ballard left for Indianapolis, and some insiders have pointed to Ballard’s management acumen and attention to detail as something Dorsey leaned on and was unable to replicate in Ballard’s absence. Dorsey landed on his feet in Cleveland, however, and he inherited both the first and fourth overall picks in the 2018 draft, setting himself and his team up for success.If Maccagnan has an opportunity at a second act as an NFL GM, he should probably follow in the footsteps of Baalke and Dorsey and seek out a team with a good coach and a high draft pick. Then he should probably pray that he never wins another executive of the year award. read more

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The Columbus Clippers lost 3-2 to the Toledo Mud Hens on Sunday afternoon after another great pitching performance by Toledo’s Armando Galarraga.A crowd of 6,092 attended the first game of a 10-game home stand for the Clippers at Huntington Park. Weather for the game was surprisingly pleasant, as the rain held off until the eighth inning. Both the Clippers and the Mud Hens received solid performances from their starting pitchers. Hector Rondon pitched five innings for the Clippers, giving up three runs on three hits while striking out five. Clippers manager Mike Sarbaugh was pleased with Rondon’s performance. “His last start, I thought he had a good start but just had one bad inning,” Sarbaugh said. “Today he threw well but he had one passed ball that let in a run, and he left a changeup up high to [Jeff] Larish and he put a good swing on it. Other than that, I thought he threw the ball pretty well.”In his second start against the Clippers this year, Galarraga allowed four hits and two runs through six innings and recorded the win. “Galarraga just has good command of his pitches,” Sarbaugh said. “He has really good sink on his fastball, and you can’t really sit on one location and one pitch. He’ll drop arm angles, and the ball moves well to both sides of the plate.”Galarraga pitched six strong innings in a victory against the Clippers on April 15.  The Mud Hens scored first in the second inning when Casper Wells scored on a pass ball from third base. In the top of the third inning, Will Rhymes led off the inning with a single. Rondon let up a two-run home run to Larish to make the score 3-0. Trevor Crowe led off the fourth inning with a double and scored on a sacrifice fly to right field by Wes Hodges. The Clippers scored another run in the fourth inning as Damaso Espino hit an RBI single to score Brian Bixler and bring the score to 3-2.That would be the end of the scoring for either side as both teams had strong performances from the bullpen. Jay Sborz recorded his seventh save for the Mud Hens and leads the league in that category. The Clippers’ record fell to a division-leading 11-7, while the Mud Hens moved to 10-8.  The team’s 11-6 record coming into the game was its best start to a season since 1999. The 1999 team finished the season 83-58, winning the division but losing in the playoffs.Backup catcher Damaso Espino said that there is a good feeling in the dugout after a good start to the 2010 season.“We have a great group of guys. We all get along very well and we’re rooting for each other,” Espino said. “It has been exciting and it is going to be a very fun year.” read more

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Lantern file photoIt will be hard to measure how much Urban Meyer altered the fate of the 2012 Ohio State football team with the performance evaluations he administered to OSU assistant coaches last June. There’s every chance that Meyer’s criticism in those evaluations played a role in the Buckeyes’s 12-0 season, and perhaps even greater accomplishments in seasons to come.The performance evaluations were obtained by The Lantern through a public records request and list the positive attributes of each coach as well as areas for improvement. Some evaluations appear less thorough than others (there was nothing listed in the “work on” section of offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Tom Herman’s evaluation) and some are vague and hard to decipher. The prevailing theme was that Meyer, whose criticism ranged from recruiting tactics to making more efficient use of the team’s time on the practice field, wanted improvement from the OSU assistants.The program’s assistants completed a self-evaluation before Meyer met with them to verbally provide his evaluation, according to a university human resources statement provided by OSU athletics spokesman Dan Wallenberg. Brief summaries of Meyer’s comments were typed on the evaluation documents, and according to the text, they were completed on June 25 and 26.Zach Smith: Wide receivers coachMeyer encouraged each OSU coach to improve on the recruiting trail, but the Buckeyes’ then-first-year receivers coach Zach Smith appeared to be a weakest link on OSU’s powerhouse staff of recruiters.According to the evaluation documents, Meyer wrote that Smith “needed improvement” with regard to recruiting, adding that he needed to work on being “thorough and intense.”Meyer also said that Smith needed to improve his on-field energy as well as his ability to complete tasks efficiently, according to the documents.Smith was more critical of himself in his self-evaluation than his peers on the OSU staff.Coaches graded themselves on a five-point scale in various categories and Smith was the only coach to give himself a grade lower than “3,” according to the documents. Smith gave himself a “2” regarding “Coaching what he sees on tape” and “Productivity in recruiting,” noting that he “need(s) to be aggressive with (wide receivers) and have conviction on area recruits — improve time management.”Tim Hinton: Tight ends, fullbacks coachDemands for “competitive excellence” and aggressive recruiting were common, but Meyer reserved what might have been his harshest criticism for Tim Hinton.Meyer said that Hinton’s top priority should be working on his “ability to articulate the offense” better, according to the evaluation. Additionally, Meyer wrote that Hinton needed to work on the “efficiency of practice time.”Mike Vrabel: Defensive line coachMeyer told Vrabel to take a wins-and-losses approach to the recruiting aspect of his job, writing, “Same approach to recruiting as playing (No excuses, W/L).”Meyer also appeared to encourage Vrabel — a three-time Super Bowl champion with the New England Patriots — to work on using his professional experience to better develop the team’s defensive line.Everett Withers: Associate head coach, co-defensive coordinator, safeties coachMuch of Meyer’s criticism for Everett Withers was related to recruiting. On the evaluation, Meyer wrote “1.) Close on a difference maker. 2.) Intensity and thoroughness in recruiting.” A third criticism – “competitive excellence of players in off-season” – was also levied.Ed Warinner: Co-offensive coordinator, offensive line coachMeyer’s No. 1 criticism of Warinner was, presumably, that he wasn’t building strong relationships on the recruiting trail. All Meyer wrote on this matter was “Relationships in recruiting.” The second item listed was closing on offensive line recruits, followed by “engagement.”Meyer’s elaboration regarding the latter only went as far as to say “family, non-football discussion.”Kerry Coombs: Cornerbacks coach and special teams coordinatorMeyer encouraged the fiery Coombs to work on closing on a big-time recruit and production of his cornerbacks unit for fall. Coombs responded to Meyer’s recommendations by helping then-sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby achieve first-team All-American honors (ESPN) after a 2012 season in which he caught a team-high five interceptions. Roby was also a Thorpe Award semifinalist.Stan Drayton: Running backs coachIn addition to encouraging Drayton to up his game on the recruiting front, it appears that Meyer wanted his running backs coach to provide fresh ideas to game plans for the running backs.“Get a big timer: recruiting,” Meyer wrote as the top item on Drayton’s evaluation. Like other OSU assistants, Meyer also said he wanted Drayton to get competitive excellence out of the running backs.Lastly, Meyer wrote, “Creativity/ideas in game planning.”Luke Fickell: Co-defensive coordinator, linebackers coachFor Fickell, whose one-season tenure as OSU head coach was sandwiched between the exit of former Buckeyes coach Jim Tressel and the arrival of Meyer, the first item of business was establishing himself as a leader on Meyer’s coaching staff. “Leadership role on staff,” wrote Meyer, who also listed Fickell’s ability to adapt and embrace his fellow staff-members as a positive.Fickell was the only coach that opted to leave a remark in the “employee’s comments” section of the evaluation, writing, “Great meeting with lots of constructive suggestions to get better.”Wallenberg declined to make any of the football coaches available for comment, saying that, generally, the department does not comment on personnel issues. So, while the extent to which coaches made improvements after their performance evaluations were administered remains to be seen, it could be safely assumed that at least a couple of Meyer’s criticisms related to on-field issues were addressed and corrected in time for the team’s undefeated, Big Ten Leaders Division championship season.Some of Meyer’s concerns regarding recruiting tactics were likely addressed as well and improved the Buckeyes’ 2013 recruiting class ranked No. 2 in America, according to Rivals.com.Again eligible for postseason competition after serving a one-year ban after the undefeated 2012 season, OSU will begin the 2013 season with an Aug. 31 game in Columbus against Buffalo. read more

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Junior forward LaQuinton Ross attempts a shot over a Nebraska defender during the Big Ten Tournament March 14 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. OSU won, 71-67.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorINDIANAPOLIS — With a chance to play in their sixth straight Big Ten Conference Tournament Championship Game, all Ohio State has to do is get past its biggest rival.After clawing back from the bowels of an 18-point deficit Friday to defeat the Nebraska Cornhuskers, 71-67, the No. 5-seeded Buckeyes (25-8, 12-8) — powered by a career-high 26 points from junior forward LaQuinton Ross — now find top-seeded Michigan waiting for them in the semifinals.The Wolverines (24-7, 16-3), survived a scare from Illinois in the quarterfinals, holding on to win 64-63 after the Fighting Illini’s last second shot fell helplessly to the Bankers Life Fieldhouse court.In the lone regular season meeting between OSU and Michigan, the Wolverines came to Columbus Feb. 11 and slid by the Buckeyes, 70-60.“This is a big time rivalry. Since I’ve been here that was the first time that’s happened, us only playing Michigan once and they beat us on our home court so it’s going to be a good game (Saturday),” Ross said after OSU’s victory against Nebraska. “Michigan’s a good team.”In the matchup last month — Michigan’s first win in Columbus in 11 years — OSU led by as many as eight in the second half, before Wolverine leading scorer and sophomore guard Nik Stauskas capitalized on an offensive dry spell by the Buckeyes take the lead for good. Stauskas led Michigan with 15 points, and freshman guard Derrick Walton Jr. scored 13 points and grabbed 10 rebounds.OSU has won six of eight games since the loss, but senior guard Aaron Craft said the rivalry takes a bigger leap Saturday because it’s at the Big Ten Tournament.“I think it’s going to mean a lot. You never want to go out losing to them. Obviously it’s a big rivalry for us and we only have to play them once,” Craft said. “You miss being able to go up there and play in front of their fans. Luckily we get them again. Not that it makes it any easier or anything like that, but it’s going to be a big game and hopefully we come ready to play.”Michigan shot 10-30 from beyond the arc in its win Friday against Illinois, its first game at Bankers Life Fieldhouse after earning a bye in the first round. OSU ranks third in the nation in defending the 3-pointer, as its opponents are shooting just 28.5 percent from there so far this season. Keeping the Wolverines’ shooters in check is going to be a team effort, Craft said.“Obviously they’re shooting the ball well. You’d think, first game coming in they’re not going to shoot that well with not that much time in the gym but they came out firing today,” Craft said. “It’s a team defensive game.”The game Saturday is set to be OSU’s third in three days, and after exerting plenty of energy while applying full court pressure to get back and eventually win the game against Nebraska, the Buckeyes could be feeling the effects.Don’t tell that to sophomore guard Amedeo Della Valle, though.“I don’t think we’re tired at all. Our last week of practice being very intense, we did a lot of conditioning to get ready for the tournament,” Della Valle, who came off the bench to score 12 points against the Cornhuskers, said. “But we gotta be ready to stop their offense because they’re very good offensively, guys like Stauskas and (sophomore guard Caris) Levert. They can shoot threes, and we gotta play physical.”OSU is now 21-5 all-time the Big Ten Tournament, and the matchup with the Wolverines will be its 34th game this season. With that in mind, OSU coach Thad Matta said the Buckeyes are getting to what they’ve been working for all year.“I think that you hope, at this point of the season, all the work you’ve done dating back this year, Sept. 28, it can come to fruition,” Matta said.With their biggest rivals standing in the way of fighting once again for Big Ten supremacy, getting up to play shouldn’t be a problem, Craft said.“If you have to be begged to play (Saturday) than I don’t know if you should be here,” Craft said.Tipoff is set for 1:40 p.m. Saturday at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. read more

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Urban Meyer leads the Buckeyes onto the field prior to the start of the game against Indiana on Oct. 6. Ohio State won 49-26. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorAfter defeating Indiana 49-26 on Saturday, Ohio State remained at No. 3 in the Associated Press Top 25 Poll released Sunday. The Buckeyes continued to earn a first place vote, finishing behind No. 1 Alabama, which earned 59 first place votes, and No. 2 Georgia. Ohio State is one of four teams from the Big Ten represented in the AP Poll. The Buckeyes join No. 8 Penn State, No 12 Michigan and No. 15 Wisconsin in the latest edition of the poll. Iowa also earned 87 votes, but failed to enter the Top 25. No. 3 Ohio State will face Minnesota in Ohio Stadium at 12 p.m. on Oct. 13.The AP Poll: Week 7 Alabama (59)Georgia Ohio State (1) Clemson (1) Notre DameWest VirginiaWashingtonPenn StateTexas UCF OklahomaMichigan LSUFloridaWisconsinMiamiOregonKentuckyColoradoNC StateAuburnTexas A&MSouth FloridaMississippi StateCincinatti read more

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first_imgCommuters in Hackney were left shocked when a loud explosion blew open a nearby manhole, following an electrical fire underground. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img

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first_img“So there can no longer be an automatic assumption that it’s OK to slash many thousands of extra hospital beds – unless and until there really are better alternatives in place for patients.”That’s why before major service changes are given the green light, they’ll now need to prove there are still going to be sufficient hospital beds to provide safe, modern and efficient care locally.”Any area which intends to cut significant numbers of hospital beds will only be allowed to do so if they fulfill strict conditions, such as increasing provision of community services, or introducing new treatments which mean patients can be seen as day cases.The change in approach follows repeated warnings from senior doctors that repeated bed cuts have left the country’s hospitals dangerously overcrowded.In just six years, the health service has cut almost 15,000 beds, equivalent to the loss of 24 hospitals. Stevens  Simon Stevens said significant bed cuts could only go ahead if they meet a series of tests  Swingeing hospital bed closures must be halted, the head of NHS has warned as he says slashing thousands of places amid a “sharp rise” in crowding levels is too risky.Simon Stevens made the intervention as NHS authorities draw up plans to attempt to save £22bn while coping with unprecented demand.Many of the draft proposals included sweeping bed cuts, as well as the closure or downgrading of up to 24 Accident & Emergency departments, 11 maternity units and 19 hospitals.But they were drawn up before the worst winter crisis in the history of the NHS, with almost half of trust declaring emergency warnings amid record occupancy levels.Now Mr Stevens has ordered officials to scale back bed cuts – ordering each area to draw up “credible implementation plans” which take proper account of current levels of strain.On Friday, he will tell a conference of NHS leaders: “More older patients inevitably means more emergency admissions, and the pressures on A&E are being compounded by the sharp rise in patients stuck in beds awaiting home care and care home places. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The intervention follows a diktat from NHS England ordering all trusts to alter their logos – this one fails the new tests  South London’s draft plans set out a 44 per cent reduction in inpatient bed days, with plans to slash 400 acute beds in Derbyshire and 200 beds from Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust.The new rules will mean significant bed cuts can only be made if NHS England officials agree that: adequate alternatives are in place, such as bolstered GP and commumnity services new treatments or therapies can be demonstrated to cut hospital admissions among certain categories of patients. hospitals which are not using beds efficiently can demonstrate credible plans to improve their performance without compromising patient care.  However, the intervention could leave NHS senior managers struggling to find ways to achieve plans to make a promised £22bn in savings by 2021.  Hospitals are under unprecedented pressure, health officials say  NHS logo  NHS big ben The NHS has the third lowest number of beds per head of population than any country in Europe, with just 2.7 beds per 1,000 population, compared with an EU average of 5.2.In recent weeks, two coroners have written to Mr Stevens, warning that lives are being put at risk because of the refusal of hospitals to take patients, for want of intensive care beds.Clare Marx, president of the Royal College of Surgeons welcomed the intervention: “This new patient care test should prevent hospital bed closures that could restrict the availability of inpatient care”, she said.Across the country, 44 areas have been ordered to draw up draft “sustainability and transformation plans” to reorganise services and meet financial pressures.But draft plans have already triggered protests.Councils in north-west London have objected to plans which could see the number of major hospitals cut from nine to five.  Dorset’s draft plans suggest cutting the number of hospital beds from 1,810 to 1,570, while Leicestershire and Rutland have drawn up proposals to cut beds from 1,940 to 1,697.last_img read more

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first_imgMrs Uriely told her son: “Mummy’s here.”She told the inquest: “I said: ‘I’d never let anything bad happen to you.”‘She said she spoke to staff about the “worst case scenario” but was told she was on a “wild goose chase”.There was no improvement in Michael’s condition on August 21, the inquest heard.Mrs Uriely made an appointment with Dr Aisha Laskor, believing that her son had been prematurely and inappropriately discharged from hospital.She felt the prospect of leaving him untreated for the weekend was “frightening” and felt that at this stage it was “imperative” that the referrals she had requested were sorted.The inquest heard that Dr Laskor expressed shock that the hospital had failed to treat Michael – but the two women disagree about what was said during the appointment.”Your recollection is completely different,” the coroner said. She told the inquest he said that Michael was “not in this category”.Mrs Uriely told the inquest she made requests for Michael to be referred to an asthma clinic as well as Great Ormond Street Hospital, but these requests did not materialise before his death.She said she was told on one occasion that Michael’s condition “didn’t require it”.Michael was admitted to the Royal Free Hospital on August 18 and discharged at 8pm the same day.He was readmitted on August 19 and sent home again the following day.On August 18, Mrs Uriely said she thought he was having the worst asthma attack she had ever seen him having.But she said she was told: “You don’t really need to be here. You should go home.”She told the inquest: “I said: ‘I can’t go without you doing some sort of test.”‘ Michael was a big sports fanCredit:PA A tragic, unnecessary death of a bright young talent… https://t.co/HuN2RbOXqx— Nigel Short (@nigelshortchess) March 15, 2017 He suggested she was saying that to “justify” her decision to send him home.Later in her evidence, a tearful Dr Laskor said: “I was still questioning my decision that evening.”Asked if Mrs Uriely appeared to be “desperate”, the doctor said: “I would have to say that no, she did not appear desperate.”Michael, who played for Barnet Knights Chess Club, died on August 25 after he collapsed in the early hours and never regained consciousness.At the time of his death he had been competing in the Mindsports Olympiad, an international multi-disciplined competition which includes chess.A memorial chess tournament was held for Michael in April last year and December’s Super Rapidplay at the London Chess Classic 2016 was also held in memory of him. I was still questioning my decision that eveningDr Laskor Dr Laskor said she was “concerned enough to consider calling for an ambulance”, but decided not to send him to hospital.She said her “gut instinct” was to send him back to hospital, but she said Mrs Uriely told her he was better since he was discharged – something Mrs Uriely says is untrue.The doctor said she told the Urielys to stay in the waiting room for 20 to 30 minutes after the appointment so that if they needed to see her again they could do so.Representing the Uriely family, Adam Korn put it to Dr Laskor: “It’s not true, is it, that Mrs Uriely said Michael had got better?” Michael’s mother Ayelet Uriely said in a statement that she was “devastated beyond words” about the loss of her son, who she described as “highly gifted”.Westminster Coroner’s Court heard that there were chances to treat Michael in the months before his death.While dealing with Mrs Uriely’s statement to the inquest, Coroner Dr Shirley Radcliffe said: “There was 11 opportunities within seven months to appropriately test, diagnose and treat him.”The inquest heard Mrs Uriely “felt strongly” that her son was denied basic care. As early as February that year, Mrs Uriely asked a doctor about the chances of her son dying as she felt his condition was deteriorating. Mrs Uriely said they were told “something like we were wasting their time”, and that Michael would grow out of asthma.The child was brought back to the hospital in the early hours of August 19, and by this stage was having violent bouts of vomiting as well as a bloated chest.The inquest heard he was told that he was “hysterical” and not having an asthma attack.Mrs Uriely was told he was being discharged that afternoon but she said she told staff: “I am scared my son will die tonight”.She also said Michael himself said he was “afraid to die”, adding that he was “not the kind of person to say something like that”. Doctors missed 11 opportunities to treat a nine-year-old chess champion in the months before he died of chronic asthma, an inquest heard.Michael Uriely, who was one of the UK’s brightest prospects in the game, was taken to the Royal Free Hospital in London twice in the days before his death after he suffered violent coughing and vomiting fits which left him struggling to breathe.The national chess champion, from St John’s Wood, north-west London, died on August 25 2015, five days after being discharged from the hospital for the second time.In the months before his death the Westminster Under School pupil was also seen by NHS GPs, as well as having private doctor appointments. Mrs Uriely said Michael’s father Roy took their son out of the room and she asked the doctor about “the likelihood of death”.She said he responded to her by saying: “What are you talking about?” Michael was a big sports fan Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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first_imgWhere did he live?He was registered as living at the Abedi family home Elsmore Road, south Manchester as recently as last year, where plainclothes police raided a downstairs red-bricked semi-detached property on Tuesday. He told the Press Association: “He was always friendly, nothing to suggest (he was violent). He was normal, to be honest.”Abedi is believed to have attended the Manchester Islamic Centre, also known as the Didsbury Mosque.Sheikh Mohammad Saeed said he believed Abedi had displayed a “face of hate” after the imam gave a sermon denouncing terrorism. Libyan refugee Abdalraouf Abdallah was sentenced to five-and-a-half years in jail last year after helping Muslim convert and former RAF Iraq War veteran Stephen Gray try to get to Syria.Abdallah, wheelchair-bound after he was shot in Libya in 2011, lived in Westerling Way, Moss Side, a short drive from Abedi’s Elsmore Road address.Gray, who lived at nearby Whitnall Street in the city, was jailed for five years for terror offences, after he twice attempted to join jihadis in Syria.Jamal al-Harith, who lived in Manchester and was known as Ronald Fiddler before converting to Islam, left the UK for Syria in 2014.Earlier this year it was reported that he died after driving a truck packed with explosives into a military base in Mosul, Iraq.It emerged he had received a compensation payment following his detention in Guantanamo Bay in the early 2000s.  Salman Abedi. Police forensic investigators at an address in Elsmore Road linked to the Manchester bomber Salman Abedi  What have the neighbours said?Neighbours in Elsmore Road told how Abedi had become increasingly devout and withdrawn.Lina Ahmed, 21, said: “They are a Libyan family and they have been acting strangely. A couple of months ago he [Salman] was chanting the first kalma [Islamic prayer] really loudly in the street. He was chanting in Arabic. “He was saying ‘There is only one God and the prophet Mohammed is his messenger’.’A family friend, who described the Abedis as “very religious”, said most of the family had returned to Libya, leaving only Salman and his older brother Ismail behind. “They have not been there for quite a while. Different people come and go,” said Alan Kinsey, 52, a car-delivery driver who lives across the street. Mr Kinsey’s wife, Frances, 48, a care worker, said she believed that the parents had left before Christmas and just one or two young men had been living in the property. How was he identified?It has emerged in US media reports that the bomber was identified by a bank card in his pocket. According to NBC News, citing a US intelligence official, members of the bomber’s family warned security officials about him in the past, saying that he was “dangerous”.The official told the broadcaster that Abedi likely “had help” making the “big and sophisticated bomb”. Azzouz, 48, an expert bomb-maker, was accused of running an al-Qaeda network in eastern Libya. The Telegraph reported in 2014 that Azzouz had 200 to 300 militants under his control and was an expert in bomb-making. Suicide bomber Salman Abedi is believed to have travelled to Syria and become radicalised before returning to the UK to cause carnage at a gig in the city where he was born.The son of Libyan parents, who reportedly fled their native country and sought refuge in the UK, he is thought to have come back to Britain from Libya just days before the massacre.Here’s everything we know about the 22-year-old Manchester Arena attacker. Police forensic investigators at an address in Elsmore Road linked to the Manchester bomber Salman Abedi Credit:PA What is his family background?Born and raised in Manchester in 1994, Abedi, the second youngest of four children, grew up in a Muslim household but matured into a university dropout with an appetite for bloodshed.His parents, mother Samia Tabbal and father Ramadan Abedi, a security officer, are Libyan-born refugees who fled to the UK to escape Gaddafi. It is thought they returned in 2011 following Gaddafi’s overthrow.Abedi is thought to have an older brother Ismail Abedi, who was born in Westminster in 1993, a younger brother Hashim Abedi, and a sister Jomana, whose Facebook profile suggests she is from Tripoli and lives in Manchester. A family friend, who asked not to be named, said the family were known to the Libyan community in the city and described Abedi as “normal”.center_img Mr Kinsey said  a huge flag, possibly Iraqi or Libyan, had been hanging from their house. “There was a large Iraqi flag hanging out the window but we never thought anything or it,” added Mr Kinsey, “We thought it was about football or a protest at home or something.”  How did he become radicalised?Abedi has “proven” links with Islamic State, according to France’s interior minister.Gerard Collomb told French television that both British and French intelligence services had information that Abedi had been in Syria.Mr Collomb said: “All of a sudden he travelled to Libya and then most likely to Syria, became radicalised and decided to commit this attack.”Abedi had been a “regular kid”, who went out and drank until around a year ago when he “dropped off the radar”, the Times reported the bomber’s former landlord’s nephew as saying.The paper quoted a friend as saying he had returned from a three-week trip to Libya in recent days.Abedi’s trips to Libya are now subject to scrutiny including links to jihadists.A group of Gaddafi dissidents, who were members of the outlawed Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), lived within close proximity to Abedi in Whalley Range.Among them was Abd al-Baset Azzouz, a father-of-four from Manchester, who left Britain to run a terrorist network in Libya overseen by Ayman al-Zawahiri, Osama bin Laden’s successor as leader of al-Qaeda. Neighbours recalled an abrasive, tall, skinny young man who was little known in the neighbourhood, and often seen in traditional Islamic clothing.He is thought to have lived at a number of addresses in the area, including one in Wilbraham Road, where officers arrested a man on Tuesday.Abedi previously lived with his parents and a brother. Other radicals from the North WestAbedi is not the first radical associated with the North West.It has been reported he knew fellow Mancunian Raphael Hostey, who was once described as an “inspirational figure” for would-be jihadis.Hostey left the UK in 2013 and became known as Abu Qaqa in his capacity as an IS fixer, encouraging other young Britons to join the terror group. He was believed to have been killed in a drone strike in 2016. Has his family spoken?Speaking for the first time about his son’s death, Abedi’s father said: “We don’t believe in killing innocents. This is not us.”Speaking from Tripoli, he told AP this his son was innocent and confirmed that British police had arrested another of his sons, believed to be a 23-year-old arrested in south Manchester on Tuesday.Abedi’s sister, Jomana, suggested he carried out the attack for revenge on US air strikes in Syria.“I think he saw children—Muslim children—dying everywhere, and wanted revenge,” she told the Wall Street Journal. “He saw the explosives America drops on children in Syria, and he wanted revenge. Whether he got that is between him and God.” Abedi’s educationAbedi went to Burnage Academy for Boys between 2009 and 2011, and then on to Salford University in 2014 where he studied business management before dropping out, according to a source. The source said Abedi began his course in 2014 and attended lectures for two years but then stopped going. He would have graduated this summer.He did not live in university accommodation, had not been in any trouble at the university and was not on any radar for pastoral or social care.It is understood Abedi was not known to have participated in any clubs or societies during his time in higher education and never met with the resident imam. His brother Hashim reportedly knew he was planning the attack.”His brother felt there was something going on there in Manchester and he thought his brother would do something like bombing or attack. So after that, he told us, ‘Having internet, I see the attack in Manchester and I knew that’s my brother’,” a spokesman for Libyan authorities told BBC2’s Newsnight.He revealed that Abedi’s younger brother Hashim had been investigated for about a month and a half over suspicions that he was linked to IS.”We were not quite sure about this, but when we arrested and we asked him, he told us, ‘I have ideology with my brother’. Hashim told us, ‘I know everything about my brother, what he was doing there in Manchester’.” Salman AbediCredit:Sky Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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first_imgFloral tributes were left at the scene Credit:SWNS Det Insp Jim Munro said: “We know that four vehicles were travelling along Little Aston Road towards Aldridge town centre at the time we believe James was stabbed and we are very keen to speak to the occupants of those cars, two light in colour and the other two darker, as they may have seen what happened and could lead us to the killer.”James had been out with friends that evening and was talking to his girlfriend as he made his way home alone. A murder victim who was stabbed through the heart while walking home from a night out died in his parents’ arms, detectives have said.A group of schoolboys leaving their prom found James Brindley, 26, and gave him first aid, but he later died at the scene after his parents rushed to his side.He had been on the phone to his girlfriend at the time he was attacked. She spoke with the schoolboys and contacted his parents so they could get there quickly. West Midlands Police said officers investigating his death of in Aldridge, near Walsall. They have yet to find a murder weapon after Mr Brindley was attacked in the High Street shortly before midnight. CCTV of cars in Aldridge at time of fatal stabbing Police want to hear from the occupants of four cars which were going past at the timeCredit:PA / West Midlands Police Floral tributes were left at the scene  Appealing for information from the community, the senior officer added: “James’s family and friends are devastated by his loss and we need to bring his killer to justice.”Someone will have knowledge of this attack and I would ask them to search their conscience and do the right thing. If you can’t speak to police then please call Crimestoppers anonymously.”Information can be passed to officers by calling West Midlands Police on 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111. “The attack lasted just seconds and four 16-year-old lads just leaving their school prom were the first to assist James by calling emergency services and providing immediate first aid.”They were also able to get in touch with James’s parents.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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first_imgA Department of Health spokeswoman said: “As the NAO report highlights, patient safety has been our first priority and no cases of harm have been identified to date.”Alongside NHS England, we have been very mindful of appropriate transparency while working to make sure this does not happen again. Last year, the Health Secretary updated Parliament and the Public Accounts Committee was informed.”The study said that while no cases of actual harm have been identified yet, a third of GPs have not yet responded on whether unprocessed items sent to them indicate potential harm for patients.An NHS England spokesman said: “NHS England was deeply concerned to be belatedly informed by SBS in March 2016 about its backlog of unprocessed correspondence.”We immediately set up a team, including clinical experts, to manage the incident, and all relevant correspondence has now been sent back to GPs for review.”None of the patients whose cases have been reviewed to date have been harmed by the delay in correspondence.”At the time of publication NHS SBS had not said whether any staff had been disciplined or sacked following the scandal.  Patients were put at risk because of the blunder, the NAO concluded  Yet when Mr Hunt finally informed parliament via a two paragraph written statement on July 21 2016, he made no reference to patient safety or the shocking scale of the problem. He simply said there had been ‘an issue with mail redirection service.’ NHS England estimates the cost of the incident will be at least £6.6 million for administration alone, the report added. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Hundreds of thousands of letters which should have been sent to patients were left in a warehouse  In August the same administrator warned bosses that the letters were being destroyed which included ‘clinically urgent’ correspondence, but it wasn’t until December 2015 that staff began a thorough investigation into what was in the letters.The NAO report concluded: “Senior managers within the NHS SBS primary care services business unit knew about the clinical risk to patients in January 2014 but it did not develop a plan to deal with the backlog.”Auditors discovered that staff deemed the mail ‘a lower priority than other work as there were no performance indicators attached to it.’NHS England and the Department of Health were informed in March 2016, but “the Department of Health decided in April 2016 not to alert Parliament or the public to the incident”, the NAO found. A spokesman for the Department of Health claimed they were trying to find a fuller picture of patient harm.Dr Richard Vautrey, BMA GP committee deputy chair said: “It is a disgrace that this service failed so badly that patient care was being compromised.”  The NAO report also pointed to the conflict of interest created by the fact Mr Hunt oversees the NHS and also sits on the board of NHS SBS, which is half owned by private company Sopra Steria.Shadow Health Secretary Jonathan Ashworth called for an apology from Mr Hunt, branding the incident ‘a total scandal’ and a ‘staggering catalogue of mistakes.’”The Secretary of State needs to explain to the public how he got himself into this conflict of interest, why the oversight of the company went wrong, and why he failed to pick up this string of mistakes for so many years,” he added.The problem first came to light in 2011, when NHS SBS inherited a backlog of clinical correspondence from primary care trusts in the East Midlands. Initial checks found around 8,000 pieces of mail but by 2014 that figure had grown to 205,000. Hundreds of thousands of letters which should have been sent to patients were left in a warehouse Credit:Andrew Milligan PA Mr Hunt put out at written statement on July 21 which mentioned an ‘issue’ NHS England estimates the cost of the incident will be at least £6.6 million for administration alone, the report added. “This was a colossal blunder, which has put 1,788 people in harm’s way – and this figure could be much, much higher,” said Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron.”This disaster left patient data, which includes blood test results and cancer screening, languishing in a warehouse. People in the Department must be held accountable for this shoddy affair.”GP leaders said the situation was ‘ a disgrace.’ Patients were put at risk because of the blunder, the NAO concluded  Yet when Mr Hunt finally informed parliament via a two paragraph written statement on July 21 2016, he made no reference to patient safety or the shocking scale of the problem. He simply said there had been ‘an issue with mail redirection service.’ In August the same administrator warned bosses that the letters were being destroyed which included ‘clinically urgent’ correspondence, but it wasn’t until December 2015 that staff began a thorough investigation into what was in the letters.The NAO report concluded: “Senior managers within the NHS SBS primary care services business unit knew about the clinical risk to patients in January 2014 but it did not develop a plan to deal with the backlog.”Auditors discovered that staff deemed the mail ‘a lower priority than other work as there were no performance indicators attached to it.’NHS England and the Department of Health were informed in March 2016, but “the Department of Health decided in April 2016 not to alert Parliament or the public to the incident”, the NAO found. A spokesman for the Department of Health claimed they were trying to find a fuller picture of patient harm.Dr Richard Vautrey, BMA GP committee deputy chair said: “It is a disgrace that this service failed so badly that patient care was being compromised.”  Jeremy Hunt kept quiet for months about a ‘major blunder’ which saw more than 700,000 letters to NHS patients mislaid, some of which contained cancer diagnosis, treatment plans and blood tests, it emerged today.The health secretary learned in March 2016 that hundreds of thousands of NHS letters had been left to pile up in warehouse by NHS Shared Business Services (NHS SBS), which is co-owned by the Department of Health.But a new report by the National Audit Office (NAO) revealed that Mr Hunt ‘decided not to alert Parliament or the public’ to the crisis even though it was known as early as December 2015 that the letters contained ‘clinical correspondence’ and staff had already binned 35 sacks.The NAO discovered that more than 1,700 patients could have been harmed by not receiving their letters. Overall, NHS England and NHS SBS discovered 709,000 items of unprocessed mail which had been steadily increasing since 2011. A Department of Health spokeswoman said: “As the NAO report highlights, patient safety has been our first priority and no cases of harm have been identified to date.”Alongside NHS England, we have been very mindful of appropriate transparency while working to make sure this does not happen again. Last year, the Health Secretary updated Parliament and the Public Accounts Committee was informed.”The study said that while no cases of actual harm have been identified yet, a third of GPs have not yet responded on whether unprocessed items sent to them indicate potential harm for patients.An NHS England spokesman said: “NHS England was deeply concerned to be belatedly informed by SBS in March 2016 about its backlog of unprocessed correspondence.”We immediately set up a team, including clinical experts, to manage the incident, and all relevant correspondence has now been sent back to GPs for review.”None of the patients whose cases have been reviewed to date have been harmed by the delay in correspondence.”At the time of publication NHS SBS had not said whether any staff had been disciplined or sacked following the scandal.  Patients may not have received cancer diagnosis or blood tests results because of the problemsCredit:Tyler Olson In June 2014, a review by NHS SBS highlighted the clinical risk to patients, and the following month an administrator wrote several emails to senior managers warning that the figure had reached 300,000. “This was a colossal blunder, which has put 1,788 people in harm’s way – and this figure could be much, much higher,” said Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron.”This disaster left patient data, which includes blood test results and cancer screening, languishing in a warehouse. People in the Department must be held accountable for this shoddy affair.”GP leaders said the situation was ‘ a disgrace.’ Mr Hunt put out at written statement on July 21 which mentioned an 'issue' The NAO report also pointed to the conflict of interest created by the fact Mr Hunt oversees the NHS and also sits on the board of NHS SBS, which is half owned by private company Sopra Steria.Shadow Health Secretary Jonathan Ashworth called for an apology from Mr Hunt, branding the incident ‘a total scandal’ and a ‘staggering catalogue of mistakes.’”The Secretary of State needs to explain to the public how he got himself into this conflict of interest, why the oversight of the company went wrong, and why he failed to pick up this string of mistakes for so many years,” he added.The problem first came to light in 2011, when NHS SBS inherited a backlog of clinical correspondence from primary care trusts in the East Midlands. Initial checks found around 8,000 pieces of mail but by 2014 that figure had grown to 205,000. In June 2014, a review by NHS SBS highlighted the clinical risk to patients, and the following month an administrator wrote several emails to senior managers warning that the figure had reached 300,000. Jeremy Hunt kept quiet for months about a ‘major blunder’ which saw more than 700,000 letters to NHS patients mislaid, some of which contained cancer diagnosis, treatment plans and blood tests, it emerged today.The health secretary learned in March 2016 that hundreds of thousands of NHS letters had been left to pile up in warehouse by NHS Shared Business Services (NHS SBS), which is co-owned by the Department of Health.But a new report by the National Audit Office (NAO) revealed that Mr Hunt ‘decided not to alert Parliament or the public’ to the crisis even though it was known as early as December 2015 that the letters contained ‘clinical correspondence’ and staff had already binned 35 sacks.The NAO discovered that more than 1,700 patients could have been harmed by not receiving their letters. Overall, NHS England and NHS SBS discovered 709,000 items of unprocessed mail which had been steadily increasing since 2011. Patients may not have received cancer diagnosis or blood tests results because of the problemslast_img read more

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first_img“We showed that we can transmit separate data streams on terahertz waves at very high speeds and with very low error rates,” said Daniel Mittleman, a professor in Brown University’s School of Engineering, in Providence, US.”This is the first time anybody has characterized a terahertz multiplexing system using actual data, and our results show that our approach could be viable in future terahertz wireless networks.”Current voice and data networks use microwaves to carry signals wirelessly, but demand is outstripping capacity so scientists have been looking at new bandwidths.Terahertz waves have higher frequencies than microwaves and therefore a much larger capacity to carry data. Error rates increased slightly when the speed was boosted to 50 gigabits per second  but were still well within the range that can be fixed using error correction systems which are commonly used in today’s communications networks.The research was published in Nature Communications. Super speeds could make downloading and streaming on the go far quicker Credit:Getty  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Woman using smartphone Ultrafast wi-fi, which is 100 times quicker than today’s mobile networks is on the horizon, after scientists proved they could send complex data using high-frequency radiation.The researchers sent video signals using terahertz, rather than traditional microwaves, at speeds of 50 gigabytes per second. Most wireless networks only operate at top speeds of 500 megabytes a second.The breakthrough could lead to high-speed streaming on the go. The researchers encoded two high-definition television broadcasts onto terahertz waves of two different frequencies then beamed both frequencies together.Experiments showed that transmissions were error-free up to 10 gigabits per second, which is much faster than today’s standard Wi-Fi speeds.last_img read more

oykplife

first_imgPolice outside a travel agents in Southport where woman was attacked and was taken to hospital, where she later died from her injuries Police outside a travel agents in Southport where woman was attacked and was taken to hospital, where she later died from her injuriesCredit:PA A man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a woman who was attacked at a travel agents died.Cassie Hayes, 28, was targeted on Saturday at the Tui branch in Southport, Merseyside, where she worked.Police were called to the scene in Chapel Street at 1.25pm and Ms Hayes was taken to hospital, where she later died from her injuries.A 30-year-old man, from the St Helens area, was detained over the incident, which is believed to be domestic related.Tributes have been paid to Ms Hayes who was described as a “lovely person” by former colleagues at Tui.One former colleague wrote on Facebook: “Such sad news about Cassie, worked with her a few times when I was working for Tui and she was such a lovely person. Thoughts are with all my friends at Tui, Tui Southport and her family and friends. RIP Cassie xxx”.Another said: “So shocked to here the sad news about Cassie. Iv [sic] not worked for Tui for a while but the time I did and worked with Cassie she was such a lovely girl. RIP Cassie. Thinking of all the Southport girls and Cassie’s family.”The woman’s next of kin have been informed, police added. Police later cordoned off the Tui branch and surrounding shops as forensic investigators examined the crime scene.A police spokeswoman said: “We can confirm a murder investigation has been launched following an incident in Southport today.”Detectives are appealing for anyone with information to contact Merseyside Police on 101 quoting log 470 of January 13 or the Crimestoppers line anonymously on 0800 555 111.”A Tui spokeswoman said: “We regret to confirm that a female member of staff at our Southport Tui retail store tragically died in an incident today.”We send our deepest sympathies to the friends and family of the staff member involved.”We’re doing everything possible to assist the local police with their investigation and support our customers and staff at this difficult time.”center_img Stunned shoppers had looked on as emergency services, including two air ambulances, rushed to the travel agents in a bid to save Ms Hayes. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

skxowwxh

first_img“But everyone uses the underground system and it’s quite easy to offend anybody really so if someone’s got their own opinion on it, it wasn’t my intention to put it up there promoting anything apart from commemorating 150 brave men who stood against 4,000.”TfL apologised to those who were offended by the message, saying the message was “clearly ill-judged”.A spokesman for the transport body said: “We apologise to any customers who were offended by the message on the whiteboard at Dollis Hill today. Eleven men were awarded with the VC after the battleCredit: Alamy The 1964 film Zulu depicted the Battle of Rorke's Drift Michael Caine featured in the film Zulu The board was later replaced with a quote from Martin Luther King Jnr The board was later replaced with a quote from Martin Luther King Jnr The 1964 film Zulu depicted the Battle of Rorke’s DriftCredit:PARAMOUNT The station worker, who is an Army reservist from a military family, said: “I’ve got quite an interest in military history and the battle of Rorke’s Drift is quite an important day in British military history so I put it up there.”I think I will keep doing historical quotes even though this happened. I never meant to offend anyone but I thought people might be interesting that’s all. The Tube worker wrote the original Rorke’s Drift notice later replaced it with a quote from Martin Luther King Jnr, the great American civil rights leader, stating: “We are not makers of history. We are made by history.” It was meant to be a simple, factual tribute to the handful of British soldiers who held off 4,000 enemy warriors at Rorke’s Drift.But when a member of staff at Dollis Hill underground station in North London wrote a brief account of the battle on their station noticeboard they were accused of “celebrating colonialism”.As a result the notice – which had marked the awarding of 11 VCs to some of the men who took part in the defence of Rorke’s Drift against the army of the Zulu kingdom – was quickly erased.Transport for London subsequently issued an apology to “any customers who were offended” by the message, which it described as “ill-judged”.The decision to remove the tribute was described as “deeply saddening” by historians and a failure to recognise the valour of individual men, regardless of political opinion. Eleven men were awarded with the VC after the battle Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Furthermore if it had been a choice between British rule and the Afrikaans almost every local inhabitant would have gone for British rule because the Afrikaan had already imposed apartheid in every area they controlled.” Michael Caine featured in the film ZuluCredit:LMKMEDIA The tribute had been written on the whiteboard at Dollis Hill in time for the morning rush hour, one of many notices posted by underground staff at stations around the capital. These frequently include motivational sayings or quotes.On this occasion the notice was simply a factual account of the battle, which stated: “On this day in history: On the 22-23 of January 1879 in natal South Africa, a small British garrison named Rorke’s Drift was attack [sic] by 4,000 Zulu warriors. “The garrison was successfully defended by just over 150 British and colonial troops. Following the battle, eleven men were awarded the Victoria Cross.”The LU worker who wrote the notice – and subsequently erased it following one complaint – said: “It was only fact, it was just what had happened. There was no opinion in there, so when someone said they weren’t happy with it, in line with what TFL tell us to do if someone complains and that we should avoid a conflict situation I just wiped it off.”People had been going through all day taking pictures of it and no one had complained, not one person said anything about it for hours – it had been up since 7am and it was after lunch that this one person said something.” “Our staff across the network share messages on these boards, but in this instance the message was clearly ill-judged. We are speaking with our staff to remind them of what is and isn’t acceptable.”But historian Andrew Roberts, the author of a History of the English Speaking Peoples Since 1900 and Masters and Commanders, said: “TfL have behaved in a pathetically politically correct way.”It’s sad that some members of the public can’t differentiate between a factual tribute to extraordinary example of British heroism, of which everyone should be proud, and the rights and wrongs of a particular political period.last_img read more

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The Finnies are on trial along with Gary Clarke, 36, who is said to have helped the couple Anthony 'Tosh' Richardson was fatally attacked outside Grimsby's Freshney Place shopping centre “She knew her husband’s personality and she wanted him to come down to physically confront Mr Richardson.” On identifying Mr Richardson it is claimed that she then made sure the camera was pointed the other way when Mr Finnie approached him outside Halifax bank.The court was told the she had radioed CCTV operator Daniel Tinmurth claiming to have seen a suspicious man it order to divert the cameras away from her husband moments before he attacked.Tim Roberts, prosecuting, said: “They wanted the attack to be quick and effective. Marc Finnie admits he attacked Antony Richardson but says it wasn’t murderCredit:Grimsby Telegraph Anthony ‘Tosh’ Richardson was fatally attacked outside Grimsby’s Freshney Place shopping centre Credit:Grimsby Telegraph Mr Roberts said that the person responsible for the killing was Mr Finnie, adding: “He admits it was him that was the attacker and the attack was unlawful and unnecessary.”Addressing the jury he added: “The issue you will decide is whether Mr Finnie is guilty of murder or guilty only of manslaughter as he suggests.“Sarah Finnie wanted her husband to punish Mr Richardson swiftly for what he had said and done to her that day.”The pair are on trial alongside Gary Clarke, a fellow security guard who worked alongside Mrs Finnie. Clarke, 36 was seen by CCTV watching the attack from the entrance of the shopping centre before going to join Mrs Finnie inside.However the court heard the he had told police he did not see the incident when questioned.Prosecutors claimed Clarke deliberately falsified his statements to the police. The trial continues.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He then left Mr Richardson unresponsive and unconscious on the pavement. He later died at hospital from a head injury.Marc and Sarah Finnie, of Grimsby, are accused of murdering Mr Richardson. Marc Finnie admits he attacked him, but denies murder.The court was told that Mrs Finnie had apparently known Mr Richardson for 10 years and they they had exchanged in a number of insults over that time.Mr Richardson had taunted Mrs Finnie outside the shopping centre about her personal life as well as calling her a murderer which related to the death of a mutual friend who died from a heroin overdose.Mr Roberts said: “She found herself more sensitive to Mr Richardson’s habitual abuse. She called Marc Finnie to tell him about the abuse. Marc Finnie admits he attacked Antony Richardson but says it wasn't murder A shopping centre security guard diverted CCTV cameras while her husband attacked and killed a homeless man, a court has heard.Sarah Finnie who worked at a shopping centre in Grimsby, Lincolnshire is alleged to have used a surveillance system to track down Anthony Richardson, 45, before calling her husband who later killed him.Mr Richardson, nicknamed “Tosh” had reportedly been been kicked out of the retail complex by Finnie after becoming abusive towards her.Following the altercation Finnie called her husband Marc who decided that “enough was enough” and went to confront Mr Richardson that day, Sheffield Crown Court was told.The court also heard that Mrs Finnie had previously received abuse from Mr Richardson.The attack happened near to the entrance of the Freshney Place shopping centre on January 15 when Finnie identified Mr Richardson on CCTV. “They also wanted to escape detection for the crime in prospect. They knew only too well about the cameras in the town centre.”He added that her alleged interference with the camera is “critical proof of the intention which she shared with her husband to inflict serious harm on Mr Richardson in swift punishment for his recent behaviour towards her”.Mr Finnie first kneed Mr Richardson in the face before punching him twice in the head. The Finnies are on trial along with Gary Clarke, 36, who is said to have helped the coupleCredit:Grimsby Telegraph read more

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I wake up to @bbc5live reports of #Northernrail “reintroducing train services”. Yet this “new era” hits the buffers and it’s not even 8am . Late running trains and two rush hour cancellations on our line already #northernfail #shambles pic.twitter.com/ZdWCR1n1Nt— Dickie | Charming Man PR (@DickieCharming) July 30, 2018 Commuters have complained of up to two hours of delays as Northern Rail reintroduced cancelled services after a timetable change that caused hundreds of delays and cancellations.It appears the attempt to make train services run more smoothly has failed somewhat, resulting in further cancellations, as passengers struggled to get trains into major northern cities including Liverpool, Manchester and Leeds. Customers complained they missed meetings and were late for work this morning as what has been dubbed “rail chaos” continued.Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham responded to the disruption, tweeting: “When is someone in the Government going to take a break from arguing about Brexit & sort this out? Country isn’t functioning at the moment.”Passenger Katharine Robbins tweeted: “730 Hartlepool to Newcastle cancelled, next train hugely delayed. Having to get to my meeting in a taxi. Is this the improved service?” Same issue: 1st day of a return to just some of the new service and we’ve got cancellations and delays already 😒 thanks Andy Burnham for keeping up with this issue! pic.twitter.com/5B5DbRSayk— Jemma-Louise Baron (@JemmaLouiseBaro) July 30, 2018 Northern’s managing director David Brown said as the services were reinstated: “The May timetable caused significant disruption for customers on some routes on our network and we’re truly sorry for that.”We introduced an interim timetable on a number of routes from 4 June, and that has enabled us to accelerate our driver training, stabilise service levels, improve performance and significantly reduce last-minute cancellations.””Whilst we are ready to reintroduce all 168 daily services, given the need to drive further improvements across Manchester, we have agreed to a more gradual reintroduction of our services. A phased introduction is the right approach to ensure a more stable and reliable service for customers.”Northern Rail was not immediately available for comment on this morning’s cancellations. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The phased reintroduction of services will see 75 per cent of services brought back today, and the remaining 25 per cent in September.  Another commuter, Derek McCabe, tweeted: “The reintegration of cancelled @northernassist services into the schedule has resulted in my train being cancelled. Congrats guys.”Jane Southwarth added: “Northern Rail day 1 6.56 Lostock to Preston cancelled. First train to Preston 8 00. Shambles.”The operator slashed nearly 170 services a day – 6 per cent of the total – in early June after a new timetable introduced in May resulted in significant disruption for passengers. @AndyBurnhamGM the first day Liverpool Lime Street is reopened and this is Northern’s service pic.twitter.com/JjjnFjCPGI— Paul Ashcroft (@mrpaulashcroft) July 30, 2018 Now, the company has brought the majority of the services back after complaints from MPs and a recommendation from industry bodies. read more

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The huge sums being paid out are deeply embarrassing for Scotland Yard at a time when bosses have complained… Almost 50 police officers guarding the Queen and other members of the Royal family took home £100,000-plus salaries in one year after bringing a claim against Scotland Yard. The latest Metropolitan Police accounts show 47 officers smashed through the £100,000 barrier in 2016/2017 as a result. The officers are tasked with guarding senior members of the Royal family as well as the prime minister and other politicians. The officers – all members of the Royalty and Specialist Protection (RaSP) unit – were given huge one-off payments after winning a dispute over their ‘special escort’ allowance. read more

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Responding to Mr Burnham’s comments, Paul Swinney, director of policy and research at Centre for Cities, said: “The recent devolution of powers to some city halls in the north of England has been welcome, and it has allowed mayors to start to take decisions for their communities.  “The ongoing issue though is that these powers are limited and uneven compared to mayors elsewhere in the world; big cities like Leeds have not struck a devolution deal with national government. The next prime minister should make this one of his priorities to fix. “Northern leaders need to be clear about what their challenges are and what powers they would like to tackle them. Much is made of transport spending in the north but our work is clear – transport is not the biggest issue in most northern cities. Instead it is skills. Addressing skills challenges is crucial to increasing the number of jobs available to people who live in these places.”Mr Burnham’s comments appear in a wide-ranging interview where he also described Westminster as a “a living nightmare”, adding that “the place is antiquated” and “and basically dysfunctional” as well as the Manchester Arena terror attack which occurred exactly two weeks after he assumed his mayoral role, saying: “I was catapulted into the darkest night I have ever experienced.”Do northerners and southerners have a different mentality? Share your thoughts in the comments below Andy Burnham has criticised Prime Ministers for being upper class and claimed that “northerners face discrimination in London”.The Greater Manchester Mayor, 49, previously served as an MP for Leigh and also held cabinet roles as health secretary as well as secretary of state for the department of culture, media and sport.However following his failed bid to become Labour leader after losing out to Jeremy Corbyn in September 2015, he relocated to Greater Manchester and was elected its first metro mayor in May 2017.He has pledged to end homelessness in the region and has dedicated his career to highlighting its inadequate transport networks. Yet he has also repeatedly complained about the prominence of the capital in comparison to the north of England.In his latest comments in an interview with the British GQ August issue, he was asked about whether there was a different mentality between northerners and southerners, and said: “I believe so. I feel that northerners face discrimination in certain walks of life in London.  How many Labour prime ministers have come from the north of England? [One: Harold Wilson] And, yes, I think that we are different.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more