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first_imgThe Environmental Health Department (EHD) of the New Amsterdam Municipality has seized a quantity of food items considered unsatisfactory for human consumption. The Department is continuously appealing to supermarkets and shop owners to desist from selling expired goods, while warning against the consequences of them being caught doing so.Municipal Health Inspector Ackloo RamsudhSome of the expired items seizedDespite this a number of supermarkets and shops in the New Amsterdam Municipality continue to vend expired goods and this was brought to the limelight as the EHD seized a quantity of expired goods from supermarkets and shops in the town which is currently celebrating its 125 anniversary as a Municipality.Among the items seized were drink mix, tomato ketchup, cake mix, chewing gum, biscuits and beverages.Head of the Department, Municipal Health Inspector, Ackloo Ramsudh, stated that there is no schedule time of visits to businesses but from time to time all of them have been found with expired goods displayed for sale.“I am appealing to business owners to check the date markings on items before they put it on the shelf for sale, they also need to check the condition of the packaging material; for example there are some packaging material which have rodent damaged, stained and some in dented cans, these are not things which are fit for human consumption and should not be displayed on shelves for sale to the consuming public,” Ramsudh declared.According to Ramsudh, his team is working to rid the shelves of harmful items but he is appalled at the callous behaviour of some businesses in the township that are bent on breaking the law. He posited that they must have respect for themselves and the general public.“Time and again officers from the department revisits particular outlets, and seize a number of expired goods on display with tampered labels,” he stated.To this end, the health inspector is asking consumers to be alert and aware when making purchases and to scrutinise items they are purchasing.“Ensure that you understand the date markings properly; these are the production date and the expiration date, ensure that they are not tampered with and also within the time specified. Every consumer has the right to thoroughly examine the products that he or she is purchasing and ask questions,” he added.Moreover, the Municipal Health Inspector is also calling on the public to refuse to make purchases at those habitual law breakers’ places and report any case of expired items or goods to the municipality or other relevant authorities forthwith.In recent times, the department has had to remove peanut butter, canned milk, biscuits, jam, mayonnaise and confectionery on shelves of shops and supermarkets that were beyond the expiry dateslast_img read more

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first_imgTWO Finn Valley AC athletes are celebrating after setting new records in their sports – and qualifying for the World Junior Athletics Championships.John Kelly through a world youth qualifying standard of 18-33 in Loughborough earlier today in the shot putt.And Fellan McGuigan followed that up at the same meeting with 66.75M in the hammer – again beating the qualifying standard. The 2013 IAAF World Youth Championships will be held in Donetsk, Ukraine, from July 10-14 2013.“It was just fantastic,” said Patsy McGonagle from FVAC.“They are very talented young men and they will now be looking forward to competing in a world-class competition in the summer.”  RECORD-BREAKERS! FINN VALLEY ATHLETES QUALIFY FOR WORLD JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIPS was last modified: April 27th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:RECORD-BREAKERS! FINN VALLEY ATHLETES QUALIFY FOR WORLD JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIPSlast_img read more

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first_img – Daily News Girl Scout collects shirts for needy NEWHALL – Hart High School student Stephanie Werts, 16, spent Thanksgiving Day handing out more than 1,000 T-shirts she had collected to people in the Midnight Mission homeless shelter in Los Angeles. The trip was part of Werts’ Girl Scout Gold Award project, Shirts Across America. Those interested in donating new T-shirts of any size to the project can contact Werts through the Girls Scouts Joshua Tree Council at (661) 287-1985 or the Hart High Associated Studen Body at (661) 259-7575. – Daily News Valencia senior wins recognition VALENCIA – Lockheed Federal Credit Union has selected Valencia High School senior Amanda Whitaker as its November Student of the Month based on her outstanding academic and leadership achievements. Amanda is currently Associated Student Body president and an active member of the National Honor Society, Spanish Honor Society, Key Club and the Valencia cheer squad. Both Amanda and Valencia High School received a cash award of $250 each for the honor. – Daily News Local moms group issues invitation VALENCIA – A Moms Mixer will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. today at a private home in Valencia. Local mothers are invited to connect with other women. For information and directions, call Liz Hodson at (661) 255-6044. – Daily News 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! NEWHALL – The Mobile Solutions Van from the Braille Institute will be available for the visually impaired from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at the Santa Clarita Valley Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. The institute van offers a wide variety of services for the visually impaired close to home. Services include the sale of assistive devices, library services registration and resource referrals. To meet with a low-vision consultant, make an appointment through the Visually Impaired Assistance service at the senior center by calling John Taylor at (661) 259-9444, Ext. 125. – Daily News Support group focuses on grief SAUGUS – Those struggling with the deaths of loved ones, especially during the holidays, are invited to attend the next meeting of Grief Share at 7 p.m. today in Room D222 at Grace Baptist Church, 22833 Copperhill Drive, Saugus. There is no sign-up necessary. For information, call Dan Broyles at (661) 296-8737, Ext. 172 or e-mail dan.broyles@gracebaptist.org. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals – Daily News DAR sponsoring student contests The Alliklik chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution is the local sponsor of the Junior American Citizen contest for students in preschool through 12th grade and an American history essay contest for students in grades five through 12. The contest consists of either a work of art or of creative expression. All works should be original and should follow the theme “Benjamin Franklin: The Many Talents of an American Patriot.” The theme for the American history essay contest for grades five through eight is “Benjamin Franklin: More than a Revolutionary.” The theme for grades nine through 12 is “The Santa Maria to the New World and the Apollo Mission to the Moon: Christopher Columbus and the Astronauts.” The deadline to enter each contest is 5 p.m. Dec. 17. For information and a list of contest rules, call Donna Yantis at (661) 259-1610. last_img read more

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first_imgJose Mourinho says he does not expect to lose his job following Chelsea’s home defeat against Liverpool.There was speculation that Mourinho could be sacked as manager if his team were beaten at Stamford Bridge, where the visitors came from behind to win 3-1.Asked if he expected it to be his last game in charge, Mourinho said: “No I don’t.”And asked if he believed he will be given more time to turn results around, he said: “Yes, I think so.”Mourinho had little to say following Chelsea’s sixth league defeat of what has so far been a dismal season.Philippe Coutinho scored twice for Liverpool after Chelsea went aheadHe refused to comment on the performance of referee Mark Clattenburg and suggestions that Liverpool’s Martin Skrtel and Lucas could both have been sent off.Mourinho, who was recently fined £50,000 by the FA and subsequently hit with a separate misconduct charge for his comments about match officials, repeatedly said “I will be punished” when asked for his view.He did, however, declare that his players remained fully behind him.“I have no doubt about that,” he said. “There are things that are out of our hands, but you could feel the attitude and desire.“If you saw some individual performances that were below the normal level, and there were not many, they still suffered because they were not able to do more. The team is together.”See also:Chelsea’s woes continue as Liverpool win at the BridgeFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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first_imgSAN JOSE — The Clarence Campbell Bowl will be inside Enterprise Center on Tuesday when the Sharks face the St. Louis Blues with their season on the line in Game 6 of the Western Conference Final.The last time the Sharks saw the trophy after a game, they were standing on the ice at SAP Center in 2016, posing for a photo with NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly after dispatching of the Blues in six games to advance to their first Stanley Cup Final.Considering the list of players that may not be …last_img read more

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first_imgOAKLAND — Sean Manaea struck out 12 batters over seven shutout innings (99 pitches) with the Las Vegas Aviators on Friday. In other words, he’s about as close as he can get to returning to the A’s rotation.But there’s a problem. A good problem: the rotation as it stands doesn’t necessarily have any cracks. Chris Bassitt, who got the ball against the San Francisco Giants on Saturday, has a 1.80 ERA over his last four starts. Tanner Roark and Mike Fiers have been consistent anchors while Brett …last_img read more

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first_imgNothing seems more hopeless than paralysis. But there are indications of hope, thanks to the body’s resiliency.One of the saddest parts of work for many health workers is to have to tell a patient there’s no hope. That’s what they told Rob Summers, a man who loved baseball and dreamed of the big leagues, until he was hit by a car and left paralyzed. Nature relates the story.Summers doesn’t recall much about the month he spent in hospital, but he does remember that the doctors waited until he was surrounded by family to tell him he was paralysed. They didn’t mince words: “You’re never going to walk. You’re never going to feel anything.” Summers refused to believe it. The doctors didn’t know how stubborn he was, how hard he could work. “I’m going to beat this,” he told his parents.Rob’s determination to overcome his fate certainly played a part in what followed. Much of it is due to medical science and the loving care of his health care workers. But most of the hope-filled article by Cassandra Willyard, “How a revolutionary technique got people with spinal-cord injuries back on their feet,” is due to built-in resiliency of the human body. Without that, no amount of will power, love or technology could have made a difference.There are no miracle cures in this story. Nobody stands up and carries his bed like the man at the pool of Bethesda in the Gospel of John, chapter 5, or leaps up and dances like the lame man in Acts 3:8. Doctors possess no such miracle-working power, and Rob Summers has a long, long way to go. “Electrical stimulation has promised huge gains for people with paralysis,” Willyard subtitles her article. “Now comes the hard part — getting beyond those first steps.”It’s evident that the body’s resiliency was key by the reaction of the doctor when Rob found he could move his toes.Susan Harkema, a neurophysiologist at the University of Louisville in Kentucky, sat nearby, absorbed in the data on her computer. She was incredulous. Summers’s toe might be moving, but he was not in control. Of that she was sure. Still, she decided to humour him. She asked him to close his eyes and move his right toe up, then down, and then up. She moved on to the left toe. He performed perfectly.Her expletive is not repeated here; suffice it to say, Harkema started paying attention. Rob asked her how that was possible that he could move his toe. “I have no idea,” she replied.Rob, true to his determination not to give up, had searched far and wide for new treatment avenues, finding Harkema’s clinic as the most promising. The doctors at Louisville did not think Rob would ever stand and walk again, but since they knew that nerves in the extremities take on some of the patterns of walking in a semi-autonomous manner apart from the brain, they reasoned, maybe those patterns could be revived with stimulation. Neural signals were not supposed to get past the point where Rob’s vertebra had severed his spinal cord, however.When Harkema and her colleagues implanted a strip of tiny electrodes in his spine in 2009, they weren’t trying to restore Summers’s ability to move on his own. Instead, the researchers were hoping to demonstrate that the spine contains all the circuitry necessary for the body to stand and to step. They reasoned that such an approach might allow people with spinal-cord injuries to stand and walk, using electrical stimulation to replace the signals that once came from the brain.So, when Summers intentionally moved his toes, Harkema was dumbfounded.Up until Rob’s surprise, doctors were focusing on stem cell therapies or surgery as possible avenues to rebuild broken connections. Others have been working on expensive robotic “exoskeletons” that could allow paralyzed patients to walk by using their hands or voice. No one expected that the body could repair itself to any noticeable degree. Now, they are realizing that some connections might still exist, even in the most severe cases, and could be strengthened with electrical stimulation.Rob’s team had been brought to tears and shouts of joy at some early successes with electrical stimulation that allowed him to stand and move his legs while suspended in a harness. They certainly did not expect a spontaneous recovery of the ability to consciously move a toe, far removed from the brain below the injury site. Willyard recounts two eruptions of celebration, first when electrical pulses stimulated Rob’s legs to move.He looked at his leg muscles contracting in the mirror. “That can’t be real,” he thought. Then he looked around the room. His mother was in tears. “People were crying and yelling and asking me ‘how is this happening?’” Harkema says. “It was a little pandemonium.”Still, that was nothing compared with the commotion that erupted six months later, when electrical stimulation allowed Summers to wiggle his toes. Harkema’s team hoped to kick-start the circuitry required for standing and stepping in the spine and legs, but they weren’t expecting to get any help from the brain. Harkema called Edgerton at his lab in Los Angeles to tell him about Summers’s toes. “Oh God, this can’t be true,” Edgerton remembers thinking. “Everybody’s going to think we’re quacks.”The rest of Willyard’s article concerns how stories like this have caused a sea change in treatment research. Many labs are now using this knowledge to explore new avenues of treatment. There’s a long way to go, with many problems to solve, and no guarantees of major recovery. She describes emotional ups and downs as Rob makes slow, modest gains. But at least science is catching up with the realization that there’s a lot more resiliency in the body than they had expected. Even for a victim of paralysis, there are moments for hope and joy.A perpetual optimist, Summers views stimulation as nothing short of a cure. For him, the biggest benefits have been the least visible — improvements in blood pressure, bladder and bowel control, sexual function and temperature regulation. And there are the more trivial sensations, such as a deep appreciation for brand new socks. “I can feel the softness,” he says. “It’s crazy the little things that I find joy in.”Most physiologists were taught that once connections to the brain are lost, they don’t come back. At least in some tentative cases, that belief has been falsified by Rob and some others.Another California Boondoggle Coming?Speaking of stem cells, Nature also reports that another stem-cell initiative is coming to California. Residents of the Golden State, who regularly fall for expensive ballot initiatives, might well remember the tear-jerking commercials by Christopher Reeve hoping that embryonic stem cells would cure his paralysis that occurred when he fell off a horse, long after his “Superman” movies. Actor Michael J. Fox also pleaded with Californians in 2004 to support the $3 billion initiative drafted by Robert Klein, implying that miracle cures were just around the corner. It passed over the objections of ethicists who warned that embryonic stem cells require killing and harvesting human embryos. President Bush had outlawed research on embryonic stem cells except for cell lines that were already in existence, but California rushed ahead, expecting everyone in the state, even those who objected, to support it. Also, in the interim, Yamanaka discovered induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), which not only avoid the ethical issues of killing embryos but also work better.The agency that resulted from the actors’ emotional pleas, CIRM, has been long on hype and heavy on spending, but poor on results. The article relates a few promising leads here and there—nothing approaching the hyped promises. Reeve died, and Fox is not cured. And now, that $3 billion is almost gone. So Klein is back with another initiative, this time asking California taxpayers for almost twice as much – $5.5 billion dollars! Is this time for the “Fool me once, fool me twice” proverb? If embryonic stem cells had actually worked, no taxpayer funds would have been needed. Drug companies themselves would have rallied to fund the research. To this day, embryonic stem cells haven’t provided any real cure. All the progress is being made using adult stem cells and iPSCs.Adult stem cell research could supplement the work on electrical stimulation and robotics, offering treatments singly or in combination to give victims of paralysis hope of regaining personal autonomy and bodily control again.If you can walk, never take that for granted. Rob Summers was an active baseball player, but his life changed in seconds. Joni Eareckson Tada has been in a wheelchair for 52 years after a diving accident (watch her touching video released July 30, and consider supporting her ministry to the disabled, Joni and Friends). The right attitude can do amazing things, as both Rob and Joni have demonstrated. We are endowed with wonderful resources within the body and brain to promote healing as far as possible. More is going on all the time, even in our sleep, than we know. When repairs are not possible human beings are uniquely capable of joy in spite of hardships. Give God thanks for whatever endowments you still have, and support research into allowing the disabled to amplify the built-in resiliency God put into our bodies in these promising new ways. The world could use a lot more gratitude, awe, and joy. (Visited 239 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_imgThis blog post was written by geocaching veteran, Geocaching HQ employee and purple enthusiast, MissJenn.Are you one of the people who recently received a souvenir for completing one of these official GeoTours? Congratulations! We hope you enjoyed the surprise. Do you have questions? We have answers.Are you a person who has never been on a GeoTour? We have answers for you, too!First things first:Souvenirs are virtual pieces of art displayed on your public profile. GeoTours combine geocaching and travel to uplevel your vacations. With this latest update, we’ve combined them for a WIN-WIN-WIN combination! Today players around the world are receiving a souvenir for any live GeoTour they have completed.Pack your bags! The hardest part will be choosing which GeoTour to do first.GeoTours are official collections of geocaches that serve as self-guided, themed tours around historic sites, parks, cities, and more. They are often sponsored by local tourism boards, historical associations, or national park systems. Local experts pick out the best places to visit. Players using the official GeocachingⓇ app while on location enjoy the dedicated section that makes GeoTour completion easy to track (see image above).How do I qualify for a GeoTour souvenir?Find all active and temporarily disabled caches on an active GeoTour to earn their unique souvenir. Archived caches are not part of the requirement. One of the caches on the GeoTour was disabled when I was there. Do I still get the souvenir?Sorry, but no. You have not completed the GeoTour. You’ll have to try the cache when it can be found again. We understand that a return trip to that location may be difficult. What is the “acquired on” date?The “acquired on” date is when you receive any digital souvenir. Although you completed a GeoTour sometime between 2012 and May 21, 2018, the “acquired on” date will display as May 21, 2018 and cannot be adjusted. If you complete a GeoTour after today, the “acquired on” date will be the actual date that you complete that GeoTour.What about the numbers?The total number of caches on a GeoTour may increase or decrease over time. Your friend who completes the GeoTour at a different time than you may earn the same souvenir by finding a different number of caches. You’d both get the same completion souvenir.What about the physical prizes?Some GeoTours offer geocoins and/or other prizes. Those are unrelated to the completion souvenir.I own some caches on a GeoTour. How can I get that souvenir?First find all of the GeoTour caches that you do not own. Then contact us specifying your username and which GeoTour you completed using the section “06. Souvenirs.”Will you make a souvenir available for completing GeoTours that used to be listed in the directory?Our goal is to offer a souvenir for the completion of every GeoTour. We will decide about now-retired GeoTours based on the initial roll out.EDIT as of June 19, 2018: We are happy to announce that yes, we will indeed make completion souvenirs available for GeoTours that used to be listed in the directory.Did you know?Both Basic and Premium members can find and log GeoTour geocaches of all types and difficulty and terrain ratings! See the Premium vs. Basic membership features chart.So where are you going?Discover the possibilities at our global GeoTour directory. Plan with interactive maps and use the official GeocachingⓇ app while on location.SamuelStem found a geocache *and* The Shy Bigfoot while on the Bonneville Bigfoots Search GeoTour (GT3E). What might you find?Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedHQ GeoTour completed: Souvenir earnedMay 8, 2018Similar postInside Geocaching HQ Podcast Transcript (Episode 15): GeoToursJune 18, 2018In “Community”GeoTours Deliver More Fun With FavoritesJune 29, 2015In “GeoTours”last_img read more

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first_imgViolence against women and girls is “the single largest human rights pandemic on this planet,” says Mallika Dutt, founder and CEO of progressive human rights group Breakthrough. Dutt had made it her mission to end violence and gender inequality by taking a fresh approach to addressing the issues. Breakthrough uses a combination of mass media, pop culture, technology, high-level partnerships and grassroots initiatives to try to transform the social and cultural norms that promote violence against women. Her campaigns have reached tens of millions of people around the planet.Umi Howard, director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lipman Family Prize for social innovation, interviews Dutt on her work, her inspirations and her hopes for the future.Mallika, in your career you’ve been a lawyer, a human rights advocate and the CEO of an international NGO. In 2000, you founded Breakthrough. Tell us, what compelled you to start this organization?Breakthrough was really an accident. I was working at the Ford Foundation in India as the Human Rights Program Officer and was thinking a lot about what we were doing in the human rights movement. I felt like we were in an echo chamber: We were talking to one another, as opposed to talking to the people around us who we were trying to transform. I started to think about outreach methods, (and) pop culture really stood out. This was during a time in India when television was becoming privatized. Previously, it was more controlled by the government.I started to formulate the idea of producing a music album with a music video that addressed violence against women. The idea started rattling around in my head. While I had lots of experience in law, philanthropy, human rights, legal service and public policy, I didn’t know anything about music production, video production or media. So I started to talk to people and got the ball rolling. I met with people in Bombay’s entertainment industry at Sony, BMG, Virgin Music and MTV. As those conversations went on, this album started to take shape.But I had many doubters. Many people said, “Album? Violence against women? Women’s issues? Really? This is not going to work.”At the end of 2000, I launched the album and music video, “Mann Ke Manjeere”, which means “Rhythm of the Mind: An Album of Women’s Dreams”. I partnered with Virgin Records on the launch. Lo and behold, the album and music video went through the charts. The musical director, lyricist, main artist and myself were inundated with media requests. All of a sudden this album and video were out there in the public space, leading a conversation about violence against women in India.When this happened I was faced with a choice: Stay at the Ford Foundation or pursue this new idea. I chose the latter. That’s how Breakthrough was born.It’s fortunate you made that choice. Can you tell us why the issue of violence against women and girls is so important?Violence against women and girls is the single largest human rights pandemic on this planet. Violence against women and girls takes place in homes, on the streets, in schools, in work places and in conflicts. Women are subjected to it everywhere. It can start with you being terminated because you happen to be a female fetus. You can be killed because you’re a female child. You can be subjected to incest and all kinds of sexual violence and abuse through your teenage years. You can also end up in a situation involving domestic violence. In the workplace, women are subjected to sexual harassment and all kinds of other forms of abuse. And even as a widow, many experience discrimination.I believe violence against women underlies many other human rights issues. It’s the place where we learn to disrespect one another. Twitter It becomes ingrained in all of our cultural, political and social institutions, and can manifest itself in unequal pay and unequal access to health care. If we don’t take on gender-based discrimination as a core issue, then many other important problems really cannot be solved.What model does Breakthrough use to approach this issue? How does Breakthrough use the media to accomplish its goals?Breakthrough aims to transform the social and cultural norms that promote violence against women. We want to stop these problems altogether, not just deal with them after they happen.I’ve found that using culture to change culture is an effective way of engaging people. When I say “using culture,” that includes social media, television, radio, print, short animations, documentaries, street theater, traditional theater and comic books. We’re not focused on one form of storytelling. We use all storytelling forms to bring people into the conversation.Media, arts and technology have been crucial to Breakthrough’s work. We’ve created several multimedia campaigns, three music videos, three video games and multiple documentaries. We’ve also won many awards.One of our most successful campaigns started in India and it called on men to challenge violence against women. The campaign had television ads, radio ads and print ads, as well as street theater and other community outreach elements. It became a global campaign that was adopted in countries including Vietnam, Pakistan and China. We called on men to be part of the solution, as opposed to simply talking to men as if they were part of the problem. There was an incredible response to that shift in our approach.As part of the campaign, we sent video vans into Indian communities to reach people in small towns and villages. The vans were accompanied by our human rights advocates – people trained to be advocates for women and girls – and this started a conversation about domestic violence at the grass roots level. The approach was very different from previous campaigns.When you invite people to the table and say, “We’ve got a problem. It’s a problem for everyone. Let’s fix it,” it’s very different from saying, “You are a problem and we need to fix you.”The next phase of the campaign was called “Ring the Bell — One Million Men, One Million Promises.” This went global last March and involved partnerships in South Africa, Brazil, Sweden, Nepal and other countries. This demonstrates how we use media, arts and culture to tell stories and we turn this into strategic partnerships with advertising agencies, government agencies, companies, grassroots organizations and celebrities. We want to engage the community and transform the societal norms that lead to violence against women.The prize committee appreciated that Breakthrough’s work addressed this truly universal issue that affects people from all walks of life. It’s also very effective at using a bottom-up, grassroots approach and a top-down approach. Can you talk about what you’re learning from the blend of those two strategies and how this can lead to change?In my past work I had completed a lot of direct service work with abused women and represented them in court. I also worked at the UN level on addressing women’s rights issues and policies. So I had experience engaging at different points of intervention.At Breakthrough, one of the things that I focused on was the question of scale. How many people can we reach with our resources? At the same time, I also understood that scale is reached through one person at a time. I was grappling with the question: How do you reach millions of people, transform millions of people and change their attitudes? I have found the media space allows you to scale your ideas. It allows you to talk to 30 million people, 130 million people or several hundred thousand people with relatively little in the way of resources.Of course, you need some resources. A public service announcement (PSA) can cost $50,000. But if my $50,000 PSA reaches 130 million people, the numbers really worked in my favor. That is why mass media, and partnerships, are so important.Now let’s look at the grassroots level. Our motto at Breakthrough is: “Human rights start with you.” We want to make sure that our messages become anchored in every single individual, wherever he or she is located. We need people to incorporate that change within themselves, otherwise it’s all just talk. That’s why the individual engagement work, community work and global constituency building work are all intertwined. And media, arts and technology are critically important to help straddle those multiple levels of engagement.Another thing about Breakthrough is your intensive work centered on India and the U.S. As you have previously said, there is no “mother ship” or parent organization. I’m curious about what you learn in India and how that influences your work in the States.Years ago, it drove me nuts that so many international organizations were based in the global North, but would call themselves “international.” These organizations often didn’t do any work in their “home” country. For example, they existed in New York City but focused all their energy on Africa. I felt that this perpetuated old colonial narratives.Therefore, when I launched Breakthrough, I incorporated it in India and the United States simultaneously. As founder, I said, “There are no headquarters and there are no field offices. Breakthrough is comprised of two centers that operate out of India and the United States. That’s how it is.”Initially, we planned to address women’s human rights issues everywhere. But within a year of the launch, the September 11, 2001 attacks took place in the United States. This led to an intense backlash against immigrant communities, communities of color, South Asians and Muslims in the United States. So I decided, as an Indian-American, to be flexible.We continued to work on the issue of violence against women in India, but in the U.S. we started to focus on the impact of 9/11 on human rights issues, including detention, deportation and developments in immigrant communities. An incredible body of work evolved in both countries and they started to inform one another.Two years ago, we decided to refocus on our main mission: making violence against women and girls unacceptable. So the India center had 13 years of incredible programming and experience, and this center provided all kinds of help and support to the U.S. team. There was a whole body of learning that we adapted from India for the U.S. market.Now in the United States we are looking at partnering with (college) fraternities as talk about sexual assault on campus has been gaining more attention. We are trying to figure out how to anchor our work within institutions and locations where this negative culture has been promoted. We are looking to … transform fraternity culture so that we can really address gender issues and challenge violence against women in a new way. Right now we’re seeing two things happen simultaneously. Firstly, the world is going to hell in a hand-basket. We have some really serious problems, including climate change, conflict, inequality, poverty and an economy that doesn’t seem to be providing jobs that offer the quality of life we had imagined. We’re seeing a lot of failing institutions and political leaders that don’t know how to fix this mess. Many people who are stuck with old ways of thinking are trying to lead us out of our current crises.At the same time, we have these emerging groups of people around the world who are beginning to understand our shared humanity. They understand that what happens to you affects me, and it’s a very interconnected world. I find this mentality is more prevalent in the younger generation than the older generation.I expect we will see a new, emergent leadership that works to solve these issues. People are thinking about how we can solve problems and use technology to address challenges in new, novel ways. The old top-down, hierarchical model of decision-making is gone. There are still pockets of people, especially men, who are holding on to that old system, but these are the holdouts. You should pay attention to this new leadership trend because the solutions that we need for our planet are going to emerge from this next generation of leaders.We at Breakthrough believe this is going to be the generation that finally makes violence against women and girls unacceptable. This is going to be the generation that will shift these old norms, attitudes and values and push society to see one another as human beings that deserve respect. This new generation will really think about how we can build a society, an economy and a world where human dignity is central to how we operate and more forward. Related Itemslast_img read more

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first_imgIrish ChickenTrent JohnstonIreland’s Trent Johnston has become very popular with children with his chicken dance. “I had decided not to reprise it (chicken dance) in this tournament, but the kids kept pestering me so I decided that if I knocked over a top player, I would do it. If I get Chris Gayle or Graeme Smith’s wicket, there will be dancing,” the 36-year-old pacer said. He could not get Smith and Gayle did not play against Ireland. Johnston did dance when he got Virender Sehwag’s wicket though. Late BloomerImran TahirImran Tahir was 30 when left Pakistan in 2006. His dream of playing international cricket was going nowhere. A chance meeting with a woman from Durban changed his life. He followed her to South Africa, became a citizen and soon came to the notice of the selectors. Tahir dedicates his success to wife Sumayya. “I always believed that I was going to play international cricket, especially after I got married,” he says.   Baby ShowerRicky PontingAustralian captain Ricky Ponting and his wife Rianna are expecting their second child in September. “Rianna and Ricky are extremely excited. The baby is due in September,” says Ponting’s manager James Henderson. Ponting is expected to return to Australia next month immediately after the World Cup before going to Bangladesh on April 9 for an away series. If the Australians retain the Cup, it would surely be Ponting’s present to the newborn.- by Kaushik Dekalast_img read more