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first_imgNo, we’re not discussing range here. Rather, the focus is on 0 to 60 MPH acceleration times.According to Tesla, the Model 3 Mid Range is officially listed as capable of sprinting from 0 to 60 MPH in 5.6 seconds, but as it turns out, this Tesla Model 3 is far quicker than that.If you’re interested in range figures and efficiency for the Model 3 Mid Range, then here are those specs:260 miles of rated range (city, highway, combined breakdown at bottom of post)128 MPGe city117 MPGe highway123 MPGe combinedAnd here’s the Tesla-provided image listing 0 to 60 MPH:Check out the video above to see what time the Model 3 Mid Range is actually capable of in the dash to 60. Hint: since it’s difficult to see the readout, we’ll note the time is in the low 5s. In the wet.Video description:Race logic  Tesla Model 3 Mid Range accelerationTesla claims 5.6 seconds 0-60, but actual time is much lower Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3: The Pros And Cons Of Extreme Innovation Watch Toyota Prius Owner Drive Tesla Model 3 For First Time It seems Tesla has again underrated the performance potential of one of its cars.Tesla seems to like to underpromise and overdeliver. That appears to be true with the Model 3 Mid Range, too.More Model 3 Info Watch Tesla Model 3 Performance Race Chevy Corvette With Slicks Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 22, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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first_img Tesla Lowers Prices On Some Model S, X In China As Import Tax Drops Tesla in China Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla is not the only one who seeks exemptions. GM, Nissan, Fiat and Uber are just a few other examples mentioned in the article.Source: Reuters Chinese Tesla Model 3 Spotted With Proper GB/T Connectorcenter_img The tariff on brains is too high.Import tariffs raised by the U.S. and China in August heavily affect many businesses.One of the most recent signals from the EV industry is Tesla’s request for exemption of the Model 3’s computer “the brain of the vehicle” produced in China, from the 25% tariff.According to Tesla, the high tariff threatens the company’s bottom line and there is no easy way to switch to another supplier. The supplier itself was not disclosed though.“In a redacted request posted on a government website by the USTR on Dec. 17, Tesla did not identify the supplier of the computer. But it said it had been unable to find another manufacturer “with the required specifications, at the volume requested and under the timelines necessary for Tesla’s continued growth.”Tesla, which called the Model 3’s computer “the brain of the vehicle,” added that “choosing any other supplier would have delayed the (Model 3) program by 18 months with clean room setup, line validation, and staff training.”Using a new supplier “substantially increases the risk of poor part quality that could lead overall vehicle quality issues that would impact the safety of our vehicles and the consumer acceptance of the final product,” Tesla added in its request for tariff relief.” Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 5, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Tesla Registers Financial Leasing Company In Chinalast_img read more

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first_imgA little planning goes a long way.We recently noted that electric vehicle road tripping in the UK can have its challenges. But what about an excursion on the European mainland? Well, it just so happens a Bloomberg contributor just recently tried to do this very thing, so let’s look at her experience and see how well that went.Some related stories Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 11, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Driving 700 Miles In The Hyundai Kona Electric In a symbolic tribute to Bertha Benz, who made what is thought to be the first road trip (110 miles!) in 1888 driving her husband Karl’s contraption to Mannheim and then back to their home, a two-way trip from Paris to that German city was decided upon. While we can’t say how much planning went into Miss Benz’s trip, it doesn’t seem like this 715-mile foray was especially well thought out.For the journey, the author chose a 2015 Tesla Model S with a range of 215 miles when fully charged. Given that the California automaker has its own Supercharger network, and that a voice request will make the car plot a complete route for you with all the stops needed, along with the expected charge times, it should have been a breeze. It wasn’t.Now, a lot of people have taken the author to task on Twitter over the resulting article, and we can understand why. There’s a pessimistic tone throughout the piece and it concludes with worries about range anxiety. This strikes many as absurd, since thousands of Tesla owners have easily made much lengthier trips with no problem.But, cut her some slack. She’s not coming from a place of malice. The venture was not about the brand, but about European charging infrastructure in general. It’s true some of the language is unfortunate. If you were skimming through, you might have gotten the impression that a trip that should have taken 10 hours actually took four days, and included over 11 hours of charging.“Over the next four days, I’ll spend 11 hours and 42 minutes charging—and that’s not counting failed attempts and time wasted on detours to stations—on what Google Maps tells me should be a 10-hour trip.”That aside, she does make some valid points. Charging infrastructure is not where it needs to be at the moment. Even one of the Supercharger stations along the way wasn’t available for use. One network required a subscription that couldn’t be completed on the fly. Yet another charging station was at a BMW dealership and not available to other brands. And, as we saw in the UK, another simply wouldn’t work.So, while it’s easy to find fault with this writer — why would one choose to stay at hotels without charging amenities, for example — perhaps we just need to realize that the charging infrastructure is still a work in progress and the unitiated may easily experience problems if they jump into a car and head out on a 700-mile adventure.Luckily, this problem is rapidly being addressed by outfits like Ionity, Fastned, Fortum, and others. The future is electric. There are just still a few speed bumps along the way.Source: Bloomberg How Tesla Cracked The Code On EV Road Trips: Model 3 Performance German Public Charging Infrastructure Grows, Still No Profits Thoughlast_img read more

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first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Aspark Owl Quicker Than A Tesla Roadster? 0 to 62 MPH In 1.9 Seconds Aspark Owl EV Claims To Be Quickest 0 To 60 MPH Car In The World Quick Look At 10 Of The Most Outrageous Electric Vehicles – Video The Japanese automaker is only building 50 of these carbon-fiber-bodied EVs.You might remember the Aspark Owl electric hypercar from its debut at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show. Development is still underway on the Japanese-built machine, and the company now says that a run at the Nürburgring record could be under consideration.More from Aspark Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 30, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News “[The] Aspark Owl performances are allowing us to aim [for] the Nürburgring record,” a company spokesperson told Top Gear. The automaker’s representative also said that a hardcore racing version was possible if there was enough demand.Aspark’s testing already shows that the Owl is capable of reaching 62 miles per hour (100 kilometers per hour) in 1.9 seconds. The company’s official specs show the hypercar being able to reach 174 mph (280 kph), but the range would be just 93 miles (150 kilometers). According to the brochure on Aspark’s site, the Owl has 429 horsepower (320 kilowatts) and 564 pound-feet (764 Newton-meters) of torque. However, Top Gear indicates that development since announcing those specs pushes the output to 1,150 hp (858 kW).The hypercar features an ultra low-slung body. The entire body is carbon fiber, and there’s a tubular frame underneath for minimizing weight. Aspark says that the machine is only 1,874 pounds (850 kilograms).At a price of 3.1 million euros ($3.5 million) and production of just 50 units, the Owl will be a very rare machine, and the company will deliver the first one in 2020.Among factory-available, road-legal production cars, the current record holder at the Nordschleife is the Aventador SVJ with a time of 6:44.97, although the Lanzante Motorsport McLaren P1 LM is even quicker at 6:43.2. The existing champion among EVs is the Nio EP9’s 6:45.90.Source: Top Gearlast_img read more

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first_imgIf you follow the segment, you well know that the Tesla Model 3 is, by far, the most popular competitor. But, the Chevrolet Bolt EV may be much more practical, and MSRP discounts are a plenty. To top it off, relatively inexpensive lease options are available in some areas.In terms of the Nissan LEAF, the company must be doing something right, as Nissan has sold some 400k LEAFs globally. Is it because it’s cheap? Perhaps that was the case in the past and even with the completely redesigned 2018 model. But, fast-forward and the LEAF’s new longer range battery pack makes it about as expensive (if not more) than the Bolt EV and Model 3.So, the above video takes all that into account to make an accurate comparison of the “Big Three” competing long-range EVs of today.What are your thoughts on how these models compare? Let us know in the comment section below. The Tesla Model 3 comes out on top in just about every way.Yes, the Chevrolet Bolt EV has its perks to attempt top the Tesla Model 3, but we haven’t really been able to find them. Ahh, it’s sorta cheaper and it offers more miles in its base configuration. The new, upcoming long-range Nissan LEAF is much the same. Of course, we need to compare range, price, features, etc. But in the end, with all things considered, how do these cars really fare?Related Content: $35,000 Tesla Model 3 Leading To Price Cuts On Chevy Bolt Tesla Model 3 Vs Chevy Bolt From An Owner’s Perspective Source: Electric Vehicle News Can Nissan LEAF Plus Compete With Tesla Model 3 & Chevy Bolt? Video Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 8, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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first_img*This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Posted by Charles Morris. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs. This Tesla Mom Shares Her Cross-Country Road Trip Experiences Road Tripping And No Tesla Supercharger? This Hack Is the Answer We’re Blown Away By Tales & Details From Incredible Tesla Road Trip Above: Model S charging at a Tesla Supercharger station (Image: Open Energi)Another surprising conclusion is that Tesla’s new V3 Superchargers won’t help the situation as much as you might expect, because they only speed up the first part of your charging. “The fastest approach would be to use [V3 Superchargers] for ‘time optimal’ supercharging, where you only recharge from 10% to 60%, which might take as little as ten minutes, plus the time to get to and from the Supercharger and park,” says Templeton. However, “as counterintuitive as it seems, if you coordinate your eating/shopping correctly, shortening the supercharge offers minor to zero value! It adds value only when you want to avoid the meal or shopping trip at the Supercharger, and prefer to just take it as downtime from your road trip.”If you insist on comparing electric cars to legacy vehicles, the former are bound to come up wanting in the context of a road trip, as they need to be “refueled” more often, and it takes longer. As Templeton explains in part two of his article, this is the wrong attitude. “Treating Superchargers as sucky gas stations with really slow filling is the path to having a vehicle you do not enjoy.” He takes a more Zen-like view: “Think of it [not] as a slow-filling car, but [as] one that fills while you do the necessities of life: sleep, eat or use the toilet. A car that charges while you sleep takes zero time, and nothing, not even gasoline, can beat that.”While it’s sometimes necessary to stop at a Supercharger, “destination charging” while you sleep is actually superior, says Templeton. You can dine wherever you want, you don’t lose the miles between the Supercharger and your hotel, and slower charging is better for your battery health. “When it works, [destination charging] is low-hassle, just like charging at home, the way it should be.”Unfortunately, there’s no easy way to shop for hotels with charging. It’s still considered something of an exotic amenity, and some establishments that do offer charging don’t advertise it. The Plugshare web page has an “amenity” setting that lets you find chargers that are at or near hotels (unfortunately the mobile app currently doesn’t offer this feature). The Chargepoint app is another valuable tool for the electric road warrior. While the best bet for finding Tesla-specific “destination chargers” may be on Tesla’s website, the search functionality remains a bit limited. TIPS AND TRICKS FOR ROAD TRIPS IN A TESLAWe do love Tesla Electric Road Trip stories, especially when they’re spiced with practical charging tips. A recent addition to the genre, from Brad Templeton, posted on Forbes, goes beyond the usual travel log of sights seen and charging difficulties overcome. Templeton’s account of a weeklong trip from San Francisco to the southern California desert to enjoy the spectacular springtime poppy bloom includes some interesting insights about how driving electric changes the overall traveling experience.Check Out These Stories:center_img Above: Taking your Tesla out for a road trip (Image: Ventricular)An electric road trip would hardly be possible without Tesla’s network of Superchargers, which can recharge a battery to half-full in less than 30 minutes, or to 80% in about 45. Templeton notes that “the range anxiety which vanishes in urban driving with a large-battery car returns to you on rural road trips. You will certainly never see a trip report from a gasoline car owner that spends half its time talking about the hunt for suitable gas stations, or how the availability of gas changed their plans.”Templeton finds that depending on Superchargers has its drawbacks. For one thing, it can limit your dining choices to what’s available near Supercharger stations – usually generic chain restaurants. That’s a sacrifice for a traveler who likes to sample the local cuisine. This problem can be mitigated by taking out food from an interesting restaurant and eating it at the nearest Supercharger station, or by simply using Supercharger stops for something other than meals – watching videos, reading or shopping (many chargers are located near shopping malls).It may sound strange, but in a way, the most efficient use of time may be to stop more often and charge to just over 50 percent. That’s because Superchargers charge at full power only when the battery is below half-full (it’s also better for the battery to keep the state of charge between 20 and 70 percent). “If you stop more often and only fill up to say 60-70%, you will spend less time charging,” Templeton writes. “However, the time needed to divert to and from the charging station and get a stall may counter that.”It’s also important to consider how busy a particular station is. “Truly full stations might have a line of unknown length (though this is rare at rural stations.) Half-full stations are ideal, since charger stalls come in pairs that share power, and you get the fastest charging only if you get an unpaired stall, or are at least the first of a pair to arrive.” Source: Electric Vehicle News Above: A look at hotel destination charging from Tesla (Image: Bulgari Hotel)Even when you find a hotel with charging, there may be bumps in the road. Few if any hotels have more than a few spaces, so in EV-heavy regions, you can’t count on getting a slot. However, in most areas the chargers are lightly used, and some hotels will reserve one for you. Templeton notes, as others have, that the bigger problem is being ICEd out of a charging spot by a gas-burner.Even if you can’t get access to a Level 2 charger at your hotel, there are a couple of tricks that can save the day. There will often be a Supercharger or some other public charger within a mile or two. “Go there and take Uber/Lyft/taxi or even a hotel shuttle back,” Templeton advises. You could also bring along a small folding scooter or bicycle, and use it to get to and from a nearby charging site. And of course, every savvy road-tripper travels with charging adapters and a nice long extension cord. Most hotels will have an outdoor 120-volt plug that can add enough miles to get you back on the road. RV parks are another valuable resource – almost all have 50-amp service, which you can use for Level 2 charging with the right adapter.===Written by: Charles Morris; Source: Forbes / Forbes*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 15, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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first_imgIn this edition of Climate Crisis Weekly:The Greens gain seats in EU elections.Greenpeace issues climate grades for the 2020 US presidential candidates.Looking into the increase of methane in the atmosphere.Calls for Harvard to divest from fossil fuels.How threatened Singapore is responding to the climate challenge.And more… more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Climate Crisis Weekly: Greens gain in Europe, 2020 candidate climate scorecard, Singapore adapts, and more appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

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first_imgIn a decision that will likely have a huge impact on mass tort and products liability litigation, the Supreme Court held in Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court of California that California courts did not have the power to decide claims against the drugmaker by non-residents whose injuries were not related to conduct that occurred within the state. Experts at Thompson & Knight believe the decision will significantly restrict litigation tourism while giving companies a powerful means to challenge personal jurisdiction . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Lost your password? Password Remember mecenter_img Username Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img read more

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first_imgNo one was injured in a fire that destroyed a home in Beverly this morning. Grant County Sheriff’s spokesman, Kyle Foreman says crews from three rural fire districts responded around 10:30 this morning to a fully engulfed manufactured home on Pasco Street . . Audio Playerhttps://kpq.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/042616-BeverlyFire.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.The fire’s cause has not been determined yet.;last_img

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first_imgShamu has the colors of a killer whale but is a sweetheart!  Here he is cuddling with Storey Burke on a visit to NewsRadio 560KPQ  To learn more about Shamu, click here for the biolast_img

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first_img Source:http://www.snmmi.org/NewsPublications/NewsDetail.aspx?ItemNumber=28682 May 2 2018German researchers have developed a novel diagnostic and therapeutic (theranostic) procedure for patients with ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a deadly cancer with an extremely poor prognosis (five-year survival rate of less than 5 percent) and limited treatment options. The study is featured in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.In early preclinical studies with animal models, the novel procedure significantly inhibited tumor growth. Focusing on the neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1), a protein that is overexpressed in ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, researchers developed a DOTA-conjugated NTR1 antagonist 3BP-227 labeled with the radioisotope lutetium-177 (177Lu) to treat and monitor therapy.Related StoriesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsEmbrace your natural skin tone to prevent skin cancer, say expertsFor this study, 6 patients with confirmed metastatic ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, who had exhausted all other treatment options, received 177Lu-3BP-227 as salvage therapy. Scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography was used with computed tomography (SPECT/CT) to determine the tumor uptake and the patients’ eligibility for treatment. If the patient’s condition allowed, 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging was performed 8-12 weeks after therapy to determine treatment efficacy.177Lu-3BP-227 was well tolerated by all patients, with the most severe adverse reaction a reversible grade 2 anemia. One patient experienced significant improvement of symptoms and quality of life–surviving 13 months from diagnosis and 11 months from the start of 177Lu-3BP-227 therapy.This study provides the first clinical evidence of the feasibility of treating ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma using 177Lu-3BP-227.”The research presented warrants further development of 177Lu-3BP-227, in order to provide patients with more effective treatment and less side effects than cytotoxic chemotherapy,” explains Christiane Smerling, PhD, head of Nuclear Medicine and Imaging at 3B Pharmaceuticals GmbH in Berlin, Germany.She points out, “Exploiting a hitherto underexplored receptor, these findings broaden the scope of nuclear medicine treatment for pancreatic adenocarcinoma and potentially other indications expressing neurotensin receptors, such as Ewing sarcoma. A theranostic approach using molecular imaging to identify potential responders will allow more effective treatment of a highly underserved patient population.”last_img read more

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first_imgJun 28 2018Infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a contagious liver disease with symptoms that range from mild illness for a few weeks to serious, lifelong liver problems. Veterans with HCV infection are almost three times as likely to have an alcohol use disorder (AUD) than veterans without HCV. It is not well understood how the dual occurrence of HCV infection and an AUD impacts a person’s immune system, mood, and brain function. This study investigated how a co-existing AUD contributes to inflammation and psychiatric problems in adults with HCV.Related StoriesRecreational marijuana users tend to drink more alcohol, medicinal users drink lessAlcohol reduction associated with improved viral suppression in women living with HIVStudy: One in five university students affected by problematic smartphone useResearchers recruited 55 male veterans with HCV from VA Health Care Systems in Portland, Long Beach, San Diego, and Minneapolis: 42 veterans with and 13 without a co-existing AUD. All participants were evaluated for their alcohol use, mood, and several inflammatory indicators three times during a 12-week period.Veterans with co-existing HCV and an AUD had more symptoms of depression and anxiety, higher levels of liver enzymes indicative of liver inflammation or cell damage and altered measures of inflammation. The researchers speculated that a greater level of psychiatric symptoms was related to greater inflammation throughout the body, and that alcohol-related changes may have contributed to an increased risk of HCV-related neuropathology. They recommended that additional studies be conducted of the effectiveness of HCV antiviral therapies on brain function among people who drink heavily. Source:http://www.rsoa.orglast_img read more

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first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The European Parliament today voted to ban the cloning of all farm animals as well as the sale of cloned livestock, their offspring, and products derived from them. The measure, which passed by a large margin, goes beyond a directive proposed by the European Commission in 2013, which would have implemented a provisional ban on the cloning of just five species: cattle, sheep, pigs, goats, and horses.The supporters of the ban cited animal welfare concerns, claiming that only a small percentage of cloned offspring survive to term, and many die shortly after birth.The ban does not cover cloning for research purposes, nor does it prevent efforts to clone endangered species. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email Companies in the United States and in China are cloning livestock for breeding and for research purposes, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration found no significant differences between healthy clones and healthy animals from conventional breeding. It considers meat and other products form clones to be as safe as that from other farm animals.There is widespread public suspicion of cloning technology in Europe, however, and E.U. member countries have said there is currently no agricultural cloning in their territories. The Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, where Dolly the sheep was cloned, no longer works on animal cloning. Farmers can import semen or embryos from cloned animals, however, and milk and meat from the offspring of cloned animals has been sold in the United Kingdom without official authorization.Representatives from parliament will now negotiate with the European Council, made up of representatives from member states, on a final version of the regulation.last_img read more

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first_imgTheorists imagined this could never happen on Jupiter, which is hotter than Saturn. This extra heat is thought to stir up the helium-hydrogen mixtures more vigorously, preventing the helium from falling out as rain. Theories have suggested helium rain on Saturn since the mid-1970s, but experimental evidence has been lacking.The evidence is now in. Collins and his colleagues used the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester in New York, which can produce 40 kilojoule pulses of intense light for a nanosecond. They first put a hydrogen and helium mixture between two diamond crystals, compressing the mixture until it became a liquid. Then they shot the laser through one end of the diamond anvil cell—vaporizing the diamond instantly and sending in shock waves that further compressed the mixture. At certain temperature and pressure thresholds, the scientists noticed a sharp rise in the conductivity of the mixture—a sign that the helium had separated out of the soup and left only the highly conductive metallic hydrogen.“That’s what triggered us to think: There’s something going on here. It looks like something strange is happening with the conductivity,” says Marius Millot, an LLNL physicist and member of the team. Millot says it took about 5 years and 300 laser shots to sketch out the phase transition across temperatures between 3000 and 20,000 kelvins and pressures between 30 and 300 gigapascals. They found that the separation occurred far more often than they expected—even at temperatures and pressures that would be found on Jupiter, he says. “People were thinking it was just in Saturn,” he says. “What we found is that maybe in both planets it occurs. The evolution of these planets may have been dramatically influenced by this separation.”The results are “unexpected” and “exciting,” says Sarah Stewart, a planetary scientist at the University of California, Davis, who was not involved in the study. Although the experimental confirmation of helium rain on Saturn is reassuring, she says, the fact that it may happen on Jupiter creates a thorny problem for theorists. “It certainly makes everyone nervous,” she says. “If it messes up Jupiter, we don’t have a complete model for the evolution of the giant planets.”But OMEGA’s results may not be the final word. Its measurements often conflict with those of Sandia National Laboratory’s Z machine, which can perform similar high-pressure experiments. “It’s a reflection of how hard it is to do experiments in this range,” says Stewart, who adds she will be looking to the Z machine for confirmation of the new results.David Stevenson, a planetary scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena and one of the theorists who originally proposed the mechanism of helium rain, said in an email that it’s always good to get experimental confirmation of a theory. But the way in which the OMEGA results match his predictions from the 1970s so well, he jokes, “must be a coincidence.”Stewart says the study should help NASA’s Juno mission come up with better models of Jupiter’s interior layers when the spacecraft goes into orbit around the planet in July 2016. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Using one of the world’s most powerful lasers, physicists have found experimental evidence for Saturn’s helium “rain,” a phenomenon in which a mixture of liquid hydrogen and helium separates like oil and water, sending droplets of helium deep in the planet’s atmosphere. The results show the range of blistering temperatures and crushing pressures at which this takes place. But they also suggest that a helium rain could also fall on Jupiter, where such behavior was almost completely unexpected.“We’re showing the first experimental evidence at conditions relevant to Jupiter and Saturn,” says Gilbert Collins, an extreme matter physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. “It’s a surprise that [this] happens over such a broad regime of temperatures and densities.” Collins described the results in a talk yesterday at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, California.Saturn is more than 50% brighter than it ought to be for a normally cooling planet. One way to account for this is through the behavior of its massive envelope of hydrogen and helium gases. As temperatures and pressures rise in the planet’s interior, the gases become liquids. At still deeper levels, the liquid hydrogen becomes electrically conductive, or metallic, while the liquid helium remains mixed in. But once conditions surpass a certain threshold of pressures and temperatures, the liquid helium is expected to fall out of the dissolved mixture. According to theory, this liquid helium forms droplets of “rain” that fall farther towards Saturn’s core, unleashing gravitational potential energy that makes Saturn more luminous.last_img read more

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first_img Aubrey Linch, an Aboriginal elder, agreed to participate in a project to study his people’s roots. By Elizabeth Culotta, Ann GibbonsSep. 21, 2016 , 1:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A decade ago, some researchers proposed the controversial idea that an early wave of modern humans left Africa more than 60,000 years ago via a so-called coastal or southern route. These people would have launched their migration from Ethiopia, crossing the Red Sea at its narrowest point to the Arabian Peninsula, then rapidly pushing east along the south Asian coastline all the way to Australia. Some genetic studies, many on mitochondrial DNA of living people, supported this picture by indicating a relatively early split between Aborigines and other non-Africans. But analysis of whole genomes— the gold standard for population studies— was scanty for many key parts of the world. The majority of Aboriginal people here in Australia believe that we have been here in this land for many thousands of years. I am ‘over the moon’ with the findings. Colleen Wall, a co-author on the Willerslev paper and elder of the Aboriginal Dauwa Kau’bvai Nation in Wynnum, Australia Almost all living people outside of Africa trace back to a single migration more than 50,000 years ago Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Australian Aborigines have long been cast as a people apart. Although Australia is halfway around the world from our species’s accepted birthplace in Africa, the continent is nevertheless home to some of the earliest undisputed signs of modern humans outside Africa, and Aborigines have unique languages and cultural adaptations. Some researchers have posited that the ancestors of the Aborigines were the first modern humans to surge out of Africa, spreading swiftly eastward along the coasts of southern Asia thousands of years before a second wave of migrants populated Eurasia.Not so, according to a trio of genomic studies, the first to analyze many full genomes from Australia and New Guinea. They conclude that, like most other living Eurasians, Aborigines descend from a single group of modern humans who swept out of Africa 50,000 to 60,000 years ago and then spread in different directions. The papers “are really important,” says population geneticist Joshua Akey of the University of Washington, Seattle, offering powerful testimony that “the vast majority of non-Africans [alive today] trace their ancestry back to a single out-of-Africa event.”Yet the case isn’t closed. One study argues that an earlier wave of modern humans contributed traces to the genomes of living people from Papua New Guinea. And perhaps both sides are right, says archaeologist Michael Petraglia of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, a co-author on that paper who has long argued for an early expansion out of Africa. “We’re converging on a model where later dispersals swamped the earlier ones,” he says. Preben Hjort, Mayday Film Three large groups of geneticists independently set out to fill the gaps, adding hundreds of fully sequenced genomes from Africa, Australia, and Papua New Guinea to existing databases. Each team used complex computer models and statistical analyses to interpret the population history behind the patterns of similarity and difference in the genomes.A team led by evolutionary geneticist Eske Willerslev of the University of Copenhagen zeroed in on Australia and New Guinea in what Akey calls a “landmark” paper detailing the colonization of Australia. By comparing Aboriginal genomes to other groups, they conclude that Aborigines diverged from Eurasians between 50,000 and 70,000 years ago, after the whole group had already split from Africans. That means Aborigines and all other non-African people descend from the same out-of-Africa sweep, and that Australia was initially settled only once, rather than twice as some earlier evidence had suggested. Patterns in the Aboriginal DNA also point to a genetic bottleneck about 50,000 years ago: the lasting legacy of the small group that first colonized the ancient continent. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In another paper, a team led by population geneticist David Reich of Harvard University comes to a similar conclusion after examining 300 genomes from 142 populations. “The take-home message is that modern human people today outside of Africa are descended from a single founding population almost completely,” Reich says. “You can exclude and rule out an earlier migration; the southern route.”But the third paper, by a team led by Mait Metspalu of the Estonian Biocentre in Tartu, makes a different claim. Analyzing 379 new genomes from 125 populations worldwide, the group concludes that at least 2% of the genomes of people from Papua New Guinea comes from an early dispersal of modern humans, who left Africa perhaps 120,000 years ago. Their paper proposes that Homo sapiens left Africa in at least two waves.Reich questions that result, but says that his and Willerslev’s studies can’t rule out a contribution of only 1% or 2% from an earlier H. sapiens migration. Akey says: “As population geneticists, we could spend the next decade arguing about that 2%, but in practical terms it doesn’t matter.” The most recent migration “explains more than 90% of the ancestry of living people.”Still, changes in climate and sea level would have favored earlier migrations, according to a fourth Nature paper. Axel Timmermann and Tobias Friedrich of the University of Hawaii, Manoa, in Honolulu reconstructed conditions in northeastern Africa and the Middle East, based on the astronomical cycles that drove the ice ages. They find that a wetter climate and lower sea levels could have enticed humans to cross from Africa into the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East during four periods, roughly around 100,000, 80,000, 55,000, and 37,000 years ago. “I’m very happy,” Petraglia says. His and others’ discoveries of early stone tools in India and Arabia suggest that moderns did expand out of Africa during the early migration windows. But those lineages mostly died out. The major migration, with more people and reaching all the way to Australia, came later. “Demographically, after 60,000 years ago something happens, with larger waves of moderns across Eurasia,” Petraglia says. “All three papers agree with that.”The studies show Aborigines’ ties to other Eurasians but also reinforce Australia’s relatively early settlement and long isolation. As such, they reaffirm its unique place in the human story. The continent holds “deep, deep divisions and roots that we don’t see anywhere else except Africa,” Willerslev says. That echoes the views of Aborigines themselves. “The majority of Aboriginal people here in Australia believe that we have been here in this land for many thousands of years,” Colleen Wall, a co-author on the Willerslev paper and elder of the Aboriginal Dauwa Kau’bvai Nation in Wynnum, Australia, wrote in an email to Science. “I am ‘over the moon’ with the findings.” For more coverage on our evolutionary roots, visit our Human Evolution topic page.last_img read more

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first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country CHRONICLE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO In February, the popular podcast The Joe Rogan Experience referred to an idea made famous by some books and TV shows: that an image of the Mayan King K’inich Janaab’ Pakal, carved onto the lid of his sarcophagus when he died in 683 C.E., shows him taking off in a spaceship. Host Rogan was skeptical of the notion, which has been used to argue that extraterrestrial visitors seeded sophisticated ancient societies like the Maya. He asked what mainstream archaeologists made of it.For David Anderson, that request was a call to action. Anderson, an archaeologist at Radford University in Virginia, jumped on Twitter: “Dear @joerogan, speaking as a ‘mainstream’ archaeologist … it depicts [Pakal] falling into the underworld at the moment of his death.” The rocket-propelling “fire” below Pakal is a personification of the underworld, and the “spaceship” is a world tree, a common feature in Mayan art. Rogan retweeted Anderson’s thread, bringing him more than 1000 likes and many grateful comments—plus some angry ones.Pakal’s supposed seat in a spaceship is just one example of what Anderson and others call “pseudoarchaeology,” which ignores the cultural context of ancient artifacts and uses them to support predetermined ideas, rather than test hypotheses, about the past. Common beliefs include that aliens helped build the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids, that refugees escaping Atlantis brought technology to cultures around the world, and that European immigrants were the original inhabitants of North America. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Believe in Atlantis? These archaeologists want to win you back to science Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Mayan King K’inich Janaab’ Pakal is not taking off in a spaceship in this image from his seventh century sarcophagus, but falling into the underworld. By Lizzie WadeApr. 9, 2019 , 5:15 PM These outlandish beliefs have been circulating for decades, but archaeologists like Anderson are now mobilizing to counter them. They are taking to Twitter, blogs, podcasts, YouTube, and newspapers to debunk false claims and explain real archaeological methods, and they plan to compare notes this week during a symposium at the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) meeting here. “My profession … needs to do a better job of speaking out,” Anderson says.He and others are alarmed by the rising popularity of pseudoarchaeological ideas. According to the annual Survey of American Fears by Chapman University in Orange, California, which catalogs paranormal beliefs, in 2018, 41% of Americans believed that aliens visited Earth in the ancient past, and 57% believed that Atlantis or other advanced ancient civilizations existed. Those numbers are up from 2016, when the survey found that 27% of Americans believed in ancient aliens and 40% believed in Atlantis.“I look at these numbers and say … something has gone massively wrong,” Anderson says. He can’t say exactly what is driving the rise in such ideas, but cable TV shows like Ancient Aliens (which has run for 13 seasons) propagate them, as does the internet.These beliefs may seem harmless or even amusing, says Jason Colavito, an author in Albany who covers pseudoarchaeology in books and on his blog. But they have “a dark side,” he says. Almost all such claims assume that ancient non-European societies weren’t capable of inventing sophisticated architecture, calendars, math, and sciences like astronomy on their own. “It’s racist at its core,” says Kenneth Feder, an archaeologist at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain, who is slated to present at the SAA session and began to write about the dangers of these ideas long before most other scholars paid attention to them.Adding to archaeologists’ sense of responsibility is that “many of these ideas started within mainstream archaeology,” says Jeb Card, an archaeologist at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. “We have to own these stories.”For example, white settlers and early archaeologists in 19th century North America excavated elaborate pre-Columbian burial mounds—but ascribed them to a lost “moundbuilder race” that was killed by the ancestors of Native Americans. Former President Andrew Jackson used those ideas to justify displacing Native Americans from their lands.Today, white nationalists make similar claims. To argue for Europeans’ deep roots in the Americas, they have latched onto Vinland, a short-lived medieval Viking settlement in eastern Canada, and the “Solutrean hypothesis,” which argues that the Americas were first peopled by arrivals from Western Europe. Neither claim started as pseudoarchaeology—Vinland was real, and the Solutrean hypothesis was proposed by mainstream archaeologists, then tested and ruled out—but they have been twisted for ideological ends. A white supremacist accused of murdering two people on a train in Portland, Oregon, in 2017 included the words “Hail Vinland!!!” in a Facebook post less than a month before the attack.“It’s really a life-or-death issue,” says Stephennie Mulder, an archaeologist and art historian at the University of Texas in Austin, who organized a 30 March symposium there called “Aliens, Atlantis, and Aryanism: ‘Fake News’ in Archaeology and Heritage,” at which Anderson was the keynote speaker.Yet archaeologists have historically been hesitant to tackle pseudoarchaeology. As the field matured in the 20th century, archaeologists moved into the academy and abdicated the public sphere, says Sara Head, an independent cultural resources archaeologist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the author of the Archaeological Fantasies blog, who is co-organizing the SAA session. “We’ve created a vacuum” that pseudoarchaeology has filled.Today, “Most archaeological research is unavailable to the public,” she says, obscured by jargon and locked behind paywalls. “But you want something from pseudoarchaeology? I can find you 15 references,” all easily accessible online and on TV.Re-engaging with the public is an uphill battle, Head says. Debunking specific claims, as Anderson did with Pakal’s “spaceship,” is merely a first step. To make a lasting impact, she and others say, archaeologists must proactively share their work and, in particular, explain their methods step by step. That’s important to counter the common pseudoarchaeological claim that researchers are hiding evidence for aliens or Atlantis.This isn’t easy work, especially online. All the women interviewed for this article have been harassed online after tackling pseudoarchaeological interpretations. Mulder recently fielded replies that included a knife emoji after she tweeted about research showing that people of diverse ancestries, rather than only Western Europeans, lived in Roman Britain. Colavito reports receiving death threats after a host of Ancient Aliens urged his fans to send Colavito hate mail.Ironically, the popularity of pseudoarchaeology also reveals intense public interest in the past. Anderson understands: His own interest in archaeology was spurred at age 18 when he read a book about a now-vanished advanced civilization that supposedly helped develop the cultures of ancient Egypt and the Maya. He was inspired to take archaeology courses in college—and found that the reality was even more exciting than the myths. “Archaeology was even better than [the book] had presented it.”last_img read more

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first_img Russian geneticist answers challenges to his plan to make gene-edited babies Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) CC STUDIO/Science Source By Jon CohenJun. 13, 2019 , 5:55 PM In a bold rejection of the widespread sentiment—and regulations in many countries—that no one should alter the genome of a human embryo and transfer it to a woman, Russian geneticist Denis Rebrikov last week went public with his plans to become the second researcher to cross this red line. “We can’t stop progress with words on paper,” Rebrikov told ScienceInsider yesterday, when asked about international efforts to ban such research.Rebrikov, who is at the Kulakov National Medical Research Center of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology in Moscow, does not yet have Russian approval to do the experiment. But, as Nature first reported on 10 June, he would like to use the genome editor CRISPR to modify the CCR5 gene in embryos so they would be highly resistant to infection with HIV.This is the strategy that Chinese researcher He Jiankui attempted in a widely condemned experiment that led to the birth of twin girls. Jiankui, who did not publicly discuss his trial until news stories revealed details of it in November 2018, triggered an international push to step up oversight of human embryo studies that create heritable, DNA changes. Concerns about this so-called “germline editing” have led some prominent scientists to call for a moratorium. An expert committee at the World Health Organization and, separately, an international commission organized by academies of sciences have been convened to wrestle with the thorny question about how to create a framework that will responsibly move germline editing from the lab to the clinic. Rebrikov, whose lab is in a busy in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic, does not plan to repeat He’s experiment—he thinks its design was flawed. In He’s study, the Chinese researcher selected couples seeking IVF in which the male partner was infected with HIV. Although this by itself does not pose much risk for an IVF baby—the virus can be washed from sperm before injecting it into an egg—He said he wanted to “genetically vaccinate” the children against future risk of infection with the AIDS virus so they would not suffer the stigma and discrimination faced by their HIV-infected fathers.Rebrikov, in contrast, wants to find HIV-infected women who have had a “weak response to antiretroviral therapy,” as he explained in a paper he published last year in the Bulletin of Russian State Medical University (where he also works). The short paper describes his preclinical work using CRISPR and its Cas9 enzyme to modify CCR5 in nonviable human embryos.Rebrikov spoke with ScienceInsider yesterday about his plans, addressing the scientific arguments against his CCR5 target and specifics about his ultimate aims and the prospect of his controversial experiment moving forward. This is a condensed version of the conversation that has been edited for clarity. Denis Rebrikov says he’s planning to use the genome editor CRISPR on a gene whose protein is used by HIV to infect cells. A Russian biologist wants to use the in vitro fertilization clinic he works at to create more gene-edited babies. Denis Rebrikov/Kulakov National Medical Research Center of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Q: In your paper, you cite two studies about pregnant, HIV-infected women who do not respond to antiretrovirals (ARVs). They’re both older studies with suboptimal drugs, and the women started treatment during pregnancy, which isn’t ideal. What current evidence is there that there are pregnant, infected women who fail all ARVs and transmit to their babies?A: We have about one woman in 30,000 to 40,000 of HIV-positive women who has no response on ARV therapy. They’re like multidrug-resistant people. We use different therapies and they still have persistence of HIV in the blood with a relatively high level. Nobody knows why it is. So this young woman who wants to get pregnant, she has a high risk of vertical transmission of the virus to the embryo. That’s the target group.Q: Russia has about 1 million infected people. That would mean you’re talking about 30 women in the country?A: Yes.Q: Only a subset of those want to get pregnant. What’s more, there’s been a steady introduction of new ARVs, and the new integrase inhibitors have extremely little evidence of people having drug resistance. Given that, what’s the rationale?A: CCR5 editing is just a proof of concept. If I can’t find an HIV-infected woman who doesn’t respond to ARV therapy and wants to be pregnant, I’ll look for different cases where both parents have a homozygous mutation for some genetic disease, like dwarfism, deafness, or blindness. We need models to start to use CRISPR embryo editing in clinical practice. I think we need several, 50, maybe 100 cases of using this technology, and after that we can we can try to use it more broadly. For example, we can see in a family that all babies will be born with a high risk of cancer. Now, when genome editing is just starting, it’s dangerous and not proven so we can’t use it with them. But in the near future, I think we can say to these parents, “Would you like to make some changes in the genome of your babies to reduce their risk of cancer?” And not only cancer, but different diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and so on.Q: But returning to HIV, even if a mother receives no treatment, transmission in utero or at birth only happens about 15% of the time. Cesarean section lowers the risk even further. You can also reduce risk by giving the newborn a liquid dose of an ARV. CRISPR, on the other hand, could alter the genome in the wrong place, causing a dangerous off-target mutation. Some studies suggest crippling CCR5 could make people more susceptible to other diseases like West Nile or even shorten life spans. How do you balance this risk versus benefit equation?A: My experiment is concentrated on creating a system of genome editing that has no off-target activity. If we can convincingly show that there is no off-target activity in the genome, this system can be used in different types of genome editing. I have maybe a unique system, and maybe it’s possible only in Russia. I don’t know. Is it worth preventing some HIV transmission at the risk of decreasing longevity or putting people at risk of other diseases? It’s a philosophical question. Nobody knows the exact answer. It depends on a lot of factors.Q: Another risk is that you can only test a small percentage of the edited cells from an embryo before you implant it. [Embryos are sometimes “mosaic,” with different mutations in different cells.] There could be off-target edits that you can’t detect.A: Yes, the main problem is the mosaicism, because I can take only five, seven cells from the blastocyst’s 250 cells. So, we always have the risk that we check these five cells and find that everything is perfect, and then have problems in the other 200 cells.Q: In the Nature article, you said you could get approval in a few months to a few years. How does the approval process in Russia work? And what are the laws and regulations regarding germline editing?A: Approval from the government is not the biggest problem, it’s not the bottleneck. For me, the bottleneck is to find the correct clinical model. If I’ll find the good case, I think that we can get approval from regulators.Q: Let’s say you find that HIV-infected woman who wasn’t responding to any ARVs, wanted to get pregnant, and was willing to do this. How long will the approval process take?A: Maybe a couple of months.Q: Have you discussed it with regulators?A: We’ve just started to discuss it, and they say that if it will be a good clinical case, we can we can discuss it further.Q: In the United States, and in many other countries, there are actually laws that prohibit germline editing. Is there any such law in Russia?A: As far as I know, we don’t have direct restriction of such type of experiments, but usually Russia agrees with international rules. I know that transmission of germline-edited embryos into women is prohibited in most countries in Europe. In Russian law, we don’t have such language.Q: So you might face international regulations that prohibit you from doing what you want to do?A: I’m not a lawyer. So I don’t have an answer.Q: Two international committees are now discussing how to move forward with germline editing, and we also know the reaction to what He Jiankui did. If Russia went forward right now with this experiment, would those international considerations come into play? A: I don’t think it’s possible to restrict some experiments worldwide. You can try to restrict it in some areas, researchers can go to islands in the Pacific Ocean if they want to do it. We can’t stop progress with words on paper. So even if we say, let’s not do the nuclear physics, because it can make a bomb, a lot of scientists will still do this. We can’t stop it. A lot of groups will try to do experiments with embryos to transfer to women, and maybe it won’t be in my group, but we will see in the next years that they will have some results, and they will publish it. That’s maybe the problem for humans on the planet, that we cannot stop the progress.Q: What’s your clinic like?A: My lab is inside one of the biggest Russian obstetrics and gynecology center and we have about 10,000 IVF cycles per year.Q: What do you think of the harsh reaction to what He did?A: That’s a normal reaction of human population and all life systems, not only humans—maybe birds. Any life system, 90% of a population is very conservative. That’s normal. And maybe 5% is progressive. We just need to wait some time, maybe some years. And we need very good clinical cases to show people that this instrumentation is powerful, but it’s safe and has good results.Q: Do you think He has been treated too harshly? A: In Russia we have a phrase that if you have success, you are right. So if he is a lucky guy and these girls will be OK, in some years he will again be seen as a good researcher.Q: What was your reaction when you first learned what he did?A: It was positive. Actually, I don’t want to be the first. I want to transfer this technology in practice, and his experiment makes it closer to practice.Q: Do you expect that if you, too, go forward you will be intensely criticized?A: In Russia I think not so much. Internationally? I don’t want to move forward until I have approval from ethical committees and regulators, and I think it will not be as crazy as his steps.Q: Has anything happened since the Nature story appeared? Has any government official called you and said, “Stop this, don’t talk about this?”A: No. Russia now, I think, is a good country to do this type of experiments. It’s not very free in politics, but it’s very free in science.Q: What do you think of germline editing that’s not for disease, but for enhancement of things like running speed, IQ, or eye color?A: It will be the next step. But in 20 to 30 years. Now, I’m opposed to it. In 2040, I’ll support it. I’m not against the idea itself. And these people who are opposed want to have all these things in their children but only by “divine providence,” not by science. They are liars or stupid.last_img read more

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first_imgAn ancient Egyptian necropolis that archaeologists date to around 2500 BC, containing the tombs of high-ranking officials, was recently discovered southeast of the famous Giza Pyramid. The find includes a limestone tomb from Egypt’s Fifth Dynasty, which stretched from the 25th to the 24th century BC, said Mostafa Waziri, secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities.The find contained the remains of two men, “Behnui-Ka, a priest, judge, and purifier who served the kings Khafre, Userkaf, and Niuserre; and Nwi Who, who served as chief of the great state, the overseer of new settlements, and purifier of Khafre,” according to the Archaeological Institute of America. The name Behnui-Ka has never been seen before on the Gaza plateau.The Great Pyramid of GizaAmong the artifacts is a limestone statue that depicts one of the men with his wife and son. The two men’s sarcophagi were found intact, which means their remains are probably inside, but no statement has been made about that as yet.The fact that these two officials were heavily involved in building had a special resonance for the Egyptian officials. Former Minister of Antiquities, Dr. Zahi Hawass, said as part of the statement made of the pyramid builders that this “shows the world that the pyramids were not built by slaves but that its builders had built their own tombs beside their kings.”Take an up-close video look at a 3,000 yr-old tomb recently discovered in Luxor:The Fifth Dynasty has yielded another important discovery in 2019: In April a tomb was found of a senior official south of Cairo. His necropolis contained brightly colored reliefs, including a vivid green. There are not many texts available to study and understand the Fifth Dynasty, with much of the context coming to experts through events recorded on stone monuments.“This picture taken on December 15, 2018 shows a general view of a newly-discovered tomb belonging to the high priest ‘Wahtye’ who served during the fifth dynasty reign of King Neferirkare (between 2500-2300 BC), at the Saqqara necropolis, 30 kilometres south of the Egyptian capital Cairo.” Photo by Khaled DESOUKI / AFP/Getty ImagesThe Fifth Dynasty is often grouped with Dynasties Three through Six, covering the period from 2650 to 2150 BC, which is called the “Old Kingdom”. Pyramids were built during this period, and in fact it is also called “the Age of the Pyramid Builder”.Historian Marc van de Mieroop has said that the Old Kingdom “is possibly unparalleled in world history for the amount of construction they undertook.”Giza pyramids. Photo by Ricardo Liberato CC BY-SA 2.0Most of the 20-odd kings of the period focused on building royal mortuaries for themselves and “they diverted enormous resources from the entire country for this purpose.”Interestingly, the ancient Egyptian necropolis discovered near Giza was reused during the Late Period, which is early 7th century BC. Many more “Late Period wooden painted and decorated anthropoid coffins were discovered on site” as well, said Waziri in a statement. Tomb re-use was common in Egyptian history.Great Pyramid of Giza from a 19th century stereopticon card photoThe Giza Pyramid, the last remaining landmark of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, still holds some mysteries. No one is precisely sure when it was built. And recently a group of scientists claimed that the Great Pyramid can concentrate electromagnetic energy in its deepest chambers.Read another story from us: New Egyptian Tomb Opened that Reveals a Special 4,300-yr-old Green PigmentExperts think the Giza Pyramid took 20 years to build but no one can fully explain the mortar used to build it or the exact technology governing its design.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. Her new book, The Blue, is a spy story set in the 18th-century porcelain world. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.comlast_img read more

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first_img Taking stock of monsoon rain Then they both proceeded on their separate ways to complete the stunt.“Maybe the biggest surprise was that the wire was as stable as it was,” Wallenda said afterward.The wire walk had the feel of an old-time spectacle, and spectators who packed Times Square seemed for the moment immune to the flashy billboards and other distractions.Wallenda began slowly from the north end of the wire. Advertising Related News Ali, 30, looked up from his steaming hot dog cart on West 45th Street on Sunday night and gazed up at a wire rigged along the length of Times Square between two skyscrapers, 25 stories above street level.“It’s crazy — they are walking through the sky,” said Ali, who for the moment had no customers.They, along with throngs of onlookers — whether tourists or jaded New Yorkers — were staring, necks craned, toward the night sky to watch Nik and Lijana Wallenda walking a wire high above Manhattan. Kala Ghoda gets a thumbs down for Times Square-like makeover Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield New Year’s Eve party in Times Square to cheer for press freedom Advertising By New York Times | Updated: June 24, 2019 12:55:17 pm Times Square, New York Times Square, New York Times square walking on wire, times square walking on wire, times square walking on wire video Siblings Nik and Lijana Wallenda wave as they prepare to pass each other on a wire over Times Square in New York (Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times)Written by Corey Kilgannon “I really want to want walk over an active volcano,” he said. “There he goes,” said Douglas Klein, a landscaper from Corvalis, Oregon, who was on vacation in New York, along with his sister Becky Bernosky and her daughters, Laci, 15, and Lindsey, 11.“It all seems kind of scary because I don’t want him to fall,” Lindsay said, staring up at Wallenda.“I don’t even like heights, so I can feel my heart racing,” said Christina Divne, who was visiting New York from Stockholm with her family, as the Wallendas walked overhead.She said the walk might have been more exciting if the Wallendas were not wearing safety harnesses, “but it would also be more messy if they fell to their deaths doing this.”Spectators applauded from the street as the Wallendas performed overhead. People watch from a building as Nik Wallenda walks on a wire during a stunt with his sister, Lijana Wallenda, over Times Square in New York (Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times)After they crossed in the middle of the wire, Nik Wallenda finished more quickly than his sister. Then the crowd cheered heartily as if to buoy Lijana Wallenda to a safe finish.For Lijana Wallenda, 42, the walk was her first high-wire attempt since a 2017 accident in which she and four other walkers fell 30 feet off a tightrope during a rehearsal and were seriously injured.After the walk, Nik Wallenda said he became emotional when meeting his sister in the middle of the wire.“It was hard to hold it together,” he said.Nik Wallenda said some of the flashing billboards were dizzying and difficult to prepare for.“How do you duplicate Times Square and the distractions?” he said.However, not all the distractions were bad: Nik Wallenda said the roar of the crowd was enthralling.“We’re entertainers — we live for that,” said Nik Wallenda, who has been walking tightropes since childhood.In 2012, he walked a wire over Niagara Falls, and in 2013, he traversed the Little Colorado River Gorge near the Grand Canyon.New York City’s love affair with death-defying stunts is well established, dating at least to Houdini’s 1912 escape from handcuffs, leg-irons and a sealed, weighted crate that was submerged in the East River. A wire strung over Times Square ahead of a stunt walk by siblings Nik and Lijana Wallenda in New York (Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times)Harry Houdini did it more than a century ago when he was shackled inside a packing crate and plunged into the East River.Daredevil Evel Knievel, dressed in his trademark red, white and blue leather jumpsuit, managed to do it in 1971 when he jumped his motorcycle over nine cars and a van in Madison Square Garden.Three years later, Philippe Petit aimed for the same effect when he walked a wire between the twin towers of the World Trade Center.The siblings are part of the Wallenda family, whose performance history dates back to the Austro-Hungarian Empire in the late 1700s.As for what wire walk Nik Wallenda should tackle next, the hot dog vendor, Ali had his own opinion.“I’m Egyptian, so of course I think his next trick should be walking between the pyramids,” Ali said.The family, whose performance history dates back to the Austro-Hungarian Empire in the late 1700s, made their American debut in 1928 as part of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus at the old Madison Square Garden, not far from where the Wallendas executed their stunt Sunday night.The Wallendas were following in the footsteps of daredevils like Houdini, who in 1912 escaped from handcuffs, leg-irons and a sealed, weighted crate that was submerged in the East River.Petit, even after being arrested and charged in connection to his World Trade Center feat, was permitted to walk a wire, untethered, over Amsterdam Avenue to St. John the Divine Cathedral in Manhattan in 1982.In 2006, the illusionist and endurance performer David Blaine spent seven days submerged in a water-filled sphere at Lincoln Center in Manhattan.But alas, times are tougher these days for performers seeking city approval for such stunts.In 2013, Nik Wallenda wanted to walk a wire strung between the Chrysler Building and the Empire State Building, but was unable to get permission from city officials.The Wallendas were able to get approval for Sunday’s walk provided they wear safety harnesses. While removing a certain element of danger, this ruling also made the 20-minute walk more difficult, and there was no safety net.“It’s like putting handcuffs on somebody and saying, ‘Now walk the wire,’ ” he said, adding that he would wear cameras and other equipment. “It’s a lot of gear and it adds more and more stress.”Sunday’s wire walk, which was broadcast live on ABC, would be more challenging than the one he envisioned for 2013, Nik Wallenda said. The Wallendas were able to get approval for Sunday’s walk provided they wear safety harnesses. While removing a certain element of danger, this ruling also made the 20-minute walk more difficult, and there was no safety net. (Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times)“The other walk, I would have been so high up and out of the mix,” he said. “In Times Square you have these crazy LED billboards distracting you the entire walk. You have thousands of people below, the city lights, the sirens, the horns. This is the most exciting walk I could do in New York City.”Nik Wallenda said he and his crew had had a window of less than six hours to rig the wire while Seventh Avenue was shut down overnight. It was 1,300 feet long and strung between 1 Times Square at the south end of the open area of Times Square at 42nd Street, and 2 Times Square, just north of the TKTS booth at 47th Street.It was a fraught process that involved avoiding power lines and construction zones, he said.“It was a massive undertaking, setting a quarter-mile cable that really involves rigging 4 miles of cable when you include the stabilizing lines,” Nik Wallenda said.After the walk, Nik Wallenda was asked what his next performance would be. More Explained Sailor in iconic V-J Day Times Square kiss photo dies at 95 Advertising Best Of Express Post Comment(s) After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan The siblings — members of the Flying Wallendas circus family — held balancing poles and started on opposite sides of a 1,300-foot wire, strung between 1 Times Square at the south end at 42nd Street, and 2 Times Square, just north of the TKTS booth at 47th Street.They slowly moved toward the center of the wire, where they met and embarked on the delicate process of passing each other.Wallenda lowered herself and sat carefully on the wire as her brother skillfully stepped over her.Wallenda said she struggled briefly when standing back up, but added, “I was calm about it — I was like, ‘I got this.’ ” Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach last_img read more

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first_img Advertising madhya pradesh, dogs transferred, canines transferred, bjp mocks move, madhya pradesh police dogs transfer, congress vs bjp, madhya pradesh government, indian express The transfer of the canines and their handlers evoked BJP’s backlash for not even sparing animals.Madhya Pradesh government’s decision to transfer 46 police dogs and their handlers from across the state has triggered a war of words between the ruling Congress and BJP. By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 15, 2019 10:24:19 pm Union minister’s son among seven held in attempt to murder case With the Congress government transferring thousands of officers and employees since the change of regime in the state seven months ago, the transfer of the canines and their handlers saw the BJP target the Kamal Nath government for not even sparing animals.On Saturday, Madhya Pradesh BJP chief and Jabalpur MP Rakesh Singh had said “It’s true that dog handlers are transferred once in a while, but the Kamal Nath government, which has made frequent transfers of officials its only business… such en mass transfers defy logic. One can understand the transfer of men who fall short of expectations but what’s the fault of animals that some of them have been sent 500 km away?”In a retort to the BJP, Congress spokesperson Abhay Dubey had observed that the loss of power has taken a toll on the Opposition party so much that it has started politicking over the transfers of dogs. He said it’s common knowledge that when handlers are transferred, their canines also go with them. Madhya Pradesh govt college principal held for ‘insulting’ Goddess Related News Advertising After facing sharp criticism from the saffron party, Congress Minister Sajjan Singh Verma said those with dog’s mentality were mocking the order. “Yeh unki (BJP) mansikta hai kutte jaisi aur kya kare (It’s their dog-like mentality, what can we do?),” ANI quoted Verma as saying.Hitting back at Verma, BJP MLA Rameshwar Sharma said those in BJP were “faithful dogs” and hence would keep raising their voices for the sake of people and security forces.“If Sajjan Singh Verma is calling us dogs then I would like to tell him that yes we are dogs, we are faithful dogs of the people of Madhya Pradesh and we will keep raising our voices for our people and our security forces,” ANI quoted Sharma as saying. In MP, 5 cops suspended after ‘custodial death’ Post Comment(s)last_img read more