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first_imgThe finals of the Children’s National Mashramani Competition continued on Friday at the National Cultural Centre as part of the Education Ministry’s Mashramani celebrations for 2018. Proceedings were carried on under the theme “Let’s Cooperate and Celebrate Republic 48”.Students from every region in Guyana were required to perform a talent piece in the categories Calypso and Dramatic Poetry. In the morning, children of ages five to 10 preformed their talent pieces, and in the afternoon, students aged 11 to 17 took to the stage. The winners of the Calypso piece for ages five to seven were Mainstay Lake Primary School of Region Two. Their piece was titled “Education Fuh We”.In the Dramatic Poetry category, grasping first place were the New Diamond Grove Primary of Region Four. Their performance was titled “Oil in Guyana is We Own.”Meanwhile, in the afternoon, the older students performed their poetry and calypso pieces, mostly in theme with the current affairs of Guyana. Some of the topics highlighted and demonstrated were the country’s 48th republic anniversary, the Guyana-Venezuela border controversy, the increasing crime rate, the oil industry, child abuse, and domestic violence.One of the competitors related that the calypso competition will bring about the rise of calypso singers in Guyana, as it is a part of our heritage.The event saw spectators of all ages, who went to support their favourite performances. The audience was filled with laugher as the students entertained them with their amusing pieces.The national competition will conclude on Saturday with the costume parade, travelling from Parade Ground all the way to the National Park.last_img read more

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first_imgPolice say they would like to speak with her, and are requesting she contact the detachment at 250-787-8132 to speak with a member of the General Investigation Section about the phone. No further details have been released.- Advertisement –last_img

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first_imgA Lifford barber trimmed his ESB bill after having an illegal device fitted to his house.Brian Gallagher fitted the device at his home after he was told about it by a customer.Gallagher, of Ard Glass, Lifford, had the device fitted for three months which disguised the reading on his outside meter at his home. The matter was only discovered when an ESB employee called to the house and found the device.Solicitor Ciaran Liddy said the ESB did not come to court to recover the revenue lost but to warn people about the dangers of such devices.Mr Liddy told Letterkenny District Court the device had been fitted by a company from Northern Ireland and had been operated between 1st July and September 6th, 2010.“The ESB’s overriding concern is one of safety and they want to put out that this is extremely dangerous as the full flow of electricity enters the house at this point where the device was fitted,” he said.Solicitor for the accused Frank Dorrian said Gallagher bought the device after an innocent conversation while cutting someone’s hair.“It was a fairly innocuous conversation and he was not aware of the hazard this device caused,” he said.However Judge Paul Kelly said this was a very serious matter and he knew of injury and even loss of life from installing such devices.It is very appropriate that the ESB has brought these proceedings to show people what can be a dangerous part of everyday life.“Luckily for him he was not involved in the mechanics of fitting this device but Mr Gallagher knew it was wrong to put in this device to reduce his bill,” he said.Judge Kelly fined Gallagher €350 under the Energy Act 1995.BARBER GETS CHOP FOR TRIMMING HIS ESB BILL WITH DEVICE was last modified: December 5th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:barberBrian GallagherdeviceESBJudge Paul Kellylast_img read more

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first_imgA brave group of individuals from Dunfanaghy are participating in a ‘Sky Dive’ to raise much needed money and awareness for Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital Crumlin.The individuals undertaking the ‘Sky Dive’ are Paddy Mc Mullan, Marie Corcran, Chloe Mc Ginley, Neil Colins, Robert McElhinney, Niall Moore, Ali Mc Kemy, Drew Campbell, Cornelius Mc Mullan and Geoffery Black.They’ve already held a string of events in recent weeks including a BBQ and a charity football match with all procedes going straight to Crumlin. They’re holding a table quiz in The Oyster Bar this SUNDAY at 9pm to raise more money for this great cause before they set off to Co.Longford on September 17th to do the ‘Sky Dive’.All money from these events goes straight to Crumlin as they are paying for the ‘Sky Dive’ from their own pocket.So PLEASE come along on Sunday for a good nights craic and to show your support to all the crew taking part and raising money for such a wonderful cause.The Group would like to thank Arnolds Hotel, Patsy Dans, The Oyster Bar and Mollys Bar for hosting these events with them. The group are also hosting a night in Mollys Bar on October 8th to have the final count of all the money that was raised, there will be also be music and refreshments available.DUNFANAGHY CREW GETTING READY TO TOUCH THE ‘SKY’ IN AID OF OUR LADY’S CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL CRUMLIN was last modified: September 5th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:charityCrumlinDunfanaghyFeaturesnewsNoticesSky Divelast_img read more

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first_imgThe annual Arranmore RNLI fundraiser that took place in September has proudly raised an impressive €5,000, the organisers have announced. The grand donation was presented to the Lifeboat Service this week to fund the vital service for all the islands and coastal communities.The group organised a fundraising night at the Waterfront Hotel Dungloe where €5000 was also raised on the night for Cancer Care West. A spokesperson for the group said: “A massive thank you to Pat Boyle (PJ Boyle Construction), Martina Rafferty, all the team at The Waterfront Hotel Dungloe and to everyone who attended and donated at our annual fundraiser in September.“A sincere thank you to everyone who helped and donated at this fantastic and important event for two very important charities.“We hope to see you all again on Saturday 28th September 2019 for our next fundraiser at The Waterfront Hotel.“Go raibh míle maith agaibh uilig ó foireann Bád tarrthala Arainn Mhóir.” Over €10,000 raised at annual Arranmore RNLI fundraiser was last modified: March 24th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Arranmore RNLIlast_img read more

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first_imgA round-up of the latest transfer speculation involving QPR…Bournemouth could be about to revive their interest in Matt Phillips, the Daily Mirror say.West London Sport recently revealed that the Cherries were among the clubs keen on the QPR winger and that Middlesbrough had had a £6m bid for him rejected.The south-coast side have since signed Benik Afobe and Lewis Grabban, but the Mirror suggests Bournemouth boss Eddie Howe could turn his attention back to Phillips after Junior Stanislas suffered a knee injury.Phillips has scored five goals for QPR this seasonMeanwhile, Livingston manager David Hopkin says Nottingham Forest have tabled a bid for the Scottish club’s 16-year-old striker Matthew Knox, who is also on QPR’s radar.Swansea City are also said to be interested in Knox, who recently trained with Manchester United.Hopkin told the Edinburgh Evening News: “We’ve had a couple of bids for him. The board are looking at Forest’s offer at this moment in time, but I think he can go higher.“Swansea and QPR have also shown their interest. If he doesn’t go anywhere then we’ll be delighted to have him.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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first_imgEarth-size exoplanets are not evidence for alien life. They are evidence for orbiting bodies.It doesn’t take much fact to launch a party in the news media. Just announce that “an earth-like planet has been found orbiting a nearby star.” Instantly, the celebrations will start.Earth-sized world ‘around nearest star’ (BBC News). Jonathan Amos writes, “the discovery of a planet potentially favourable to life in our cosmic neighbourhood is likely to fire the imagination.“Earth-sized planet around nearby star is astronomy dream come true (Nature). Alexandra Witze writes, “a longstanding dream of science-fiction writers — a potentially habitable world that is close enough for humans to send their first interstellar spacecraft.”Aliens Next Door: Does Proxima b Host Life? (Space.com). Speculations abound: “probing that atmosphere for signs of life — would have huge implications for the abundance of life in the universe.” See also “What’s it like on Proxima b?” by Sarah Lewin on Space.com.Alien World ‘Proxima b’ Around Nearest Star Could Be Earth-Like (Live Science). The video in this piece provides some harsh realities: Proxima b orbits its red dwarf every 11 earth-days. It gets X-radiation 400 times stronger than what earth receives from the sun. And astronomers aren’t sure if the world is rocky or a ball of gas.Getting to Proxima b might become an existential requirement (New Scientist). Our sun will burn out in a few more billion years, but “Proxima Centauri will shine on for a trillion years, basking the planet in its warm, inviting glow. If humans or our descendants are still around, we will need somewhere to move to.” See also Stephen Baxter‘s hope for our far distant future.Looking For Life on Proxima b? Try Glowing Aliens (National Geographic). The unobservable aliens on our neighboring exoplanet are so smart, they’ve already evolved ways to glow in the dark! Since there’s a lot less light for them to see by, “It’s a more evolutionarily appropriate scenario.”The announcement in Nature shows how the planet around Earth’s nearest neighboring star, Proxima Centauri, was discovered. The planet, called Proxima b, “lies squarely in the centre of the classical habitable zone for Proxima,” the authors say, but that’s just 0.05 Au (4.6 million miles) from its star. It’s 1.3 times as massive as Earth. They have to deal with bad news of trying to live around a red dwarf star: (1) possibility of tidal locking, (2) strong stellar magnetic fields, (3) strong flares, (4) high UV radiation, and (5) high X-radiation: 400 times stronger than what Earth receives. They try to hope that none of these things would strip the planet’s atmosphere away (if it even has one).As we have shown many times, though (e.g., 06/23/16), habitability requires much more than a safe distance where water can exist in liquid form. Here’s another: does Proxima b have Van Allen Belts? The twin Van Allen Probes recently detected a “space tsunami” of supercharged electrons accelerated to almost the speed of light on March 17 by one of the greatest geomagnetic storms of the previous decade (Science Daily). The deadly electrons, which could pose severe hazards to spacecraft or astronauts, did not reach Earth because of our planet’s strong magnetic field that creates the Van Allen Belts. Our sun is a quiet star compared to most red dwarfs, and yet one coronal mass ejection gave our shields a strong hit. What about planets that don’t have that kind of protection orbiting stars that emit deadly flares on a regular basis?Magnetic fields, moreover, are not eternal. Another paper in Nature tried to address the persistent puzzle about Earth’s magnetic field and its origin.Recent palaeomagnetic observations report the existence of a magnetic field on Earth that is at least 3.45 billion years old. Compositional buoyancy caused by inner-core growth is the primary driver of Earth’s present-day geodynamo, but the inner core is too young to explain the existence of a magnetic field before about one billion years ago.To address that conundrum, the authors supposed that an impact brought in enough magnesium to kick-start the convection needed to drive the geodynamo (the energy source for the field, according to consensus theory). Whether this would work is certainly to be debated, but the point is: without a magnetic shield, it doesn’t matter if a planet is in the habitable zone. Life could not survive extreme UV, X-rays and cosmic rays.An exoplanet needs the right atmosphere. Space.com reminds readers that another exoplanet dubbed “Exo-Venus” could be a hellish world, even with oxygen.When studying an alien world orbiting another star, one would think astronomers would be thrilled to detect oxygen in its atmosphere. Oxygen could mean life, after all. But in the case of GJ 1132b, which orbits a star 39 light-years away, the detection of oxygen would mean the exact opposite.The exoplanet, which can be thought of as an “exo-Venus,” is, as you’d expect, a hellish world. It has a very compact orbit around its star, at a distance of only 1.4 million miles, ensuring that it’s constantly baked by the star’s powerful radiation.So where should we look for life? Paul Rincon at the BBC News reminds us that many factors are needed besides water. The magnetic field is important. A quiet star is important. Red dwarfs, which make up 75% of stars, are not exactly the best candidates.For those thinking an earth-like planet close to home is good, Jacob Aron at New Scientist has bad news. Interstellar probes would be eroded by space dust on the way. When you accelerate to 1/5 the speed of light—as some dreamers propose—the kinetic energy of tiny dust grains becomes significant. If a direct hit of a dust particle doesn’t wipe out your ship, it would certainly cause severe wear and tear. Aron also lists 7 questions we need to ask about Proxima b in another article on New Scientist, including “Are there aliens” there?The Dream Is On! – Or, Dream OnWithout the ability to detect life on Proxima b or any other exoplanet anytime soon, the dreamers feed on hope. “What do aliens look like?” Matthew Wills dreams on The Conversation. His answer: “The clue is in evolution.” That’s not likely to impress evolution skeptics. More precisely, Wills says: “The answer to this question really depends on how we think evolution works at the deepest level.” So why does he appeal to the Cambrian Explosion and convergent evolution for insight? Those are two of the biggest criticisms of Darwinian evolution. Darwin skeptics point to those as clues that evolutionists have no idea how evolution works at the deepest level.Answering Fermi’s ParadoxHarvard dreamer Avi Loeb has a new answer to Enrico Fermi’s old conundrum: if aliens have evolved longer than we have, they should have come by now. Loeb’s new answer, published in the Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, is that we are the early birds. PhysOrg explains the idea in layman terms. “A team of researchers including astrophysicists from the University of Oxford has set about trying to answer these questions—and their results raise the possibility that we Earthlings might be the first to arrive at the cosmic party.” It’s a convenient answer. Too bad there is no evidence to confirm or falsify it. Every factor in the calculation is highly speculative.Returning to the hype about Proxima b, David Klinghoffer notes at Evolution News & Views that evolutionists feel a deep need to find life. “If it could ever be known that only one planet in the cosmos was graced with biology, that would pose an insurmountable difficulty for Darwinists.” And so they hope on.The one constant in the hope and hype about aliens is scientific materialism. That worldview has no better process than Darwinian evolution. But since Darwinism reduces to the Stuff Happens Law, the answer to everything they say about astrobiology reduces to Stuff Happens as well. Read Doug Axe’s new book Undeniable, where he shows that some stuff never happens: namely, the emergence, without insight, of hierarchically-arranged, functionally coherent operational wholes. Like life. (Visited 56 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Emily UnglesbeeDTN Staff ReporterROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Turns out there are a few creatures out there that are enjoying the wet mess of the 2019 planting season.Some early season caterpillars and slugs are out and feasting on small, late-planted corn and soybean fields.These fields are especially vulnerable to damage from insects this year, cautioned University of Illinois Extension entomologist Nick Seiter.“In general, the later the planting, the younger the plant is when they feed on it,” Seiter explained. “And younger plants are less able to overcome that stress.”To add to the problem, many growers missed spring herbicide applications, which allowed some fields to get “pretty hairy” and host a lot of insects, Seiter noted. “A lot of weeds in a field allows caterpillar pests to complete their early development and then, once the weeds are burned down, they need to find something to eat.”Here are this week’s top culprits to watch for:BLACK CUTWORMCutworms are active in much of the Midwest now, and they do their worst damage in young cornfields that haven’t yet reached the V5 or V6 growth stage.They typically lay their eggs in weedy vegetation and then move to corn. Weedy fields and cover crop fields are most at risk. In the early stages of development, namely instars one through three, black cutworms will feed through the stem of a young corn plant, producing a distinctive “shothole” appearance, Seiter noted. By the fourth instar, the cutworm is capable of completely “cutting” a corn plant off — either stunting it or killing it if the cut is below the growing point.“That’s the damage we’re most worried about — the stand loss situation,” Seiter said.Some Bt traits, such as Cry1F and Vip3A, do target black cutworms, but the bigger the cutworm larvae, the less protection the traits will provide, Seiter said.“The traits are much more potent against early instars, so how well it works depends on the timing of the interaction,” he explained. “Usually, once cutworms get up to cutting size, the trait will deter but not necessarily stop them.”The black cutworm is a particularly ugly insect — Seiter describes its black color as having a “greasy, dull sheen,” although they aren’t actually slimy to the touch. During the day, the cutworm burrows down into the soil, so scouting means getting your hands a little dirty by brushing aside soil near damaged plants.If you find that 3% to 5% of your corn stand is suffering from cutworm damage, and the insects are still active in the field, it may be prudent to spray for them, Seiter said. See more details on recommendations for managing black cutworm from the University of Illinois here: https://ipm.illinois.edu/….ARMYWORMSTrue armyworms share a lot of the same early-season habits of the cutworm, such as a great love of weedy vegetation and a taste for young corn plants. However, armyworms often target soybeans and wheat in addition to corn, and they have a preference for grassy weeds or crops, such as rye.“The reason they get their name is that, once a food source has run out, they will all march in unison to a new food source together,” Seiter explained.Armyworms are defoliators — they will feed on corn leaves, but don’t have the same cutting potential as the black cutworm, and corn is usually more resilient to their feeding, Seiter added. “Corn can take a lot of damage early on, as long as they haven’t fed on the growing point,” he said. Remember that only the Vip3A Bt protein protects corn against true armyworm — check the Bt Trait table here: https://agrilife.org/….Avoid useless “revenge applications” by making sure that armyworms are still active in your field when you spy significant damage. “If you can’t find any larvae, it’s because they’ve developed and moved on, so you want to make sure they are there and actively feeding before you treat,” Seiter said.See more details on true armyworm management from the University of Missouri, which lists different treatment thresholds for different crops: https://ipm.missouri.edu/….Finally, cutworms and armyworms may have cycled out of fields and pupated in some parts of the Midwest, so growers should check local trapping networks for guidance on the timing of potential infestations, Seiter added. For example, Illinois growers can find their state’s trapping information here: http://bulletin.ipm.illinois.edu/….SLUGSBy far the most frustrating of the three pests selected here are slugs, which are extremely hard to treat in-season.These slimy pests favor wet weather and plenty of residue, so no-till fields, cover crop fields and fields coming out of pasture or the CRP program are at the highest risk for damage.“When they do really well is when we have wet conditions right around planting and cool, wet weather persists and slows down development of the plants and give slugs more time to do damage,” Seiter said.Soybeans are often most at risk, because the slugs are more likely to destroy their growing point and kill the plant entirely, Seiter added. Corn can overcome their feeding better. Fields with open seed slots — often the result of mudding seed in — are also at risk, he said. “That open seed slot makes a nice location for the slug to hide, and it will feed on germinating seeds right as they push cotyledon out.”As mollusks, slugs are not affected by insecticides, which makes controlling them extremely difficult. Molluscicides exist, but they are often expensive, of limited availability and can be impractical for large-scale crop fields, Seiter noted. Tillage can help, but it is obviously not a good solution for no-till farmers, he added.“The best solution, unfortunately, is often to just wait it out,” he said. “Slugs do not like hot summer temperatures.”See more on slug management from Penn State University here: https://ento.psu.edu/…Emily Unglesbee can be reached at Emily.unglesbee@dtn.comFollow her on Twitter @Emily_Unglesbee(AG/SK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#cloud#cloud computing#news alex williams Related Posts The data boom is making analytics companies some of the hottest properties in the market. That’s evident from today’s news that EMC is buying Greenplum, a data warehouse, big data and analytics company used by Skype, T-Mobile and a host of companies including NASDAQ and Fox Interactive Media.Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Greenplum is a privately held company that has raised $61 million in venture financing. Greenplum is just 7 years old but, according to eWeek, already has proved a formidable challenger to such technology giants as Oracle, which ironically has an investment in the company. Greenplum has made its bigget mark by serving companies with large amounts of data in the cloud. The technology will serve as the key underpinning of a new data computing product division within EMC’s Information Infrastructure business.Data warehousing and analytics are becoming a potent combination for large scale processing of data. Hadoop has gained considerable traction with its distributed storage capabilities.Companies with in-memory technologies are getting more attention. SAP made it a center piece of discussion at SAP Sapphire. In March, Tibco updated its Spotfire application. SAS announced an in-memory analytics technology last month. IBM continues making acquisitions with a focus on analytics. Last month, the company announced how companies such as RTL Nederland, an entertainment company, is using IBM social analytics tools to gain feedback and in turn change the nature of its programming.All these companies recognize the problems that come with the massive amount of data that people produce. It’s just the beginning as more of our world connects through the Web and beyond to all forms of physical objects. According to IDC, the amount of digital data created annually will grow 44 times.For EMC, the crown jewel is Greenplum’s massive parallel processing architecture. According to EMC, the technology is capable of delivering 10 to 100 times the performance of traditional database software.center_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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first_imgLast week, the MFLN Family Development Early Intervention team brought you a blog with three perspectives on the routines-based interview (RBI).  This week, we offer you a short video of one parent’s experience and thoughts.  Joy’s two children were in Early Intervention at different times.  As a result, one of her children completed a RBI.  However, for the other, they did not.  Joy offers providers a powerful perspective from a parent’s point of view.This post was edited by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration area on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, and YouTube.last_img read more